Past Events

Advancing wellness for sexual 
orientation and gender variant minorities.

Advancing wellness for sexual
orientation and gender variant minorities.

    Wednesday, June 18, 2014

  • Social Exclusion Simulation (+)

    6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    Chicago Campus

     

     

    The Social Exclusion Simulation is a group experiential learning tool for increasing understanding of complex systems and how the structural barriers that comprise them work to block access to key rights, resources and opportunities for some members of society, rendering them “socially excluded.”

    2.5 C.E.U.’s will be offered to psychologists, counselors, social workers, marriage and family therapists, and interested non-psychologists. Please indicate this on your reservation request.

    Participants include students, faculty and staff of the Adler School, members of the greater Chicagoland community, anyone interested in learning more about social exclusion. Participants adopt authentic Chicago-based case histories of formerly incarcerated women and are tasked with re-entering society – finding a place to live, a job, healthcare and other necessities – in the face of structural and systemic barriers.

    Participant outcomes include:

    • An increased understanding of what structural and systemic barriers are and how they work to undermine opportunity and access.
    • Increased appreciation of practical limits of personal responsibility, agency, and choice.
    • Increased motivation to adopt attitudinal and behavioral changes in pursuit of social change.
    • Increased empathy for other marginalized groups.
    • Apprehend the shock and disappointment about roadblocks of re-entry.

    To register and for more information about the Social Exclusion Simulation, contact the Institute on Social Exclusion at ISE@adler.edu.

  • Thursday, May 22, 2014

  • Cuban Women’s Voices: Diverse Work of Three Cuban Feminists (+)

    6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    Chicago Campus, Rm 16-100

     

     

    Noted Women Studies Scholar Dr. Norma Vasallo Baruetta, PhD is a Professor of Social Psychology and Women's Studies at the University of Havana, and Chair of the Women's Studies Department. She has been a central figure in the integration of multicultural gender studies perspectives in the curriculum at the University of Havana.

    Followed by a panel discussion with:

    • Gisela Arandia Covarrubias is an author and researcher on issues of race and identity based out of UNEAC, the Cuban Union of Artists and Writers. She has made many contributions through the course of a long career. She holds a degree in Journalism and has been a researcher and writer.
    • Norma Guillard Limonta is an adjunct professor at the University of Havana teaching psychology and gender, a leader of the Cuban Association of Psychologists. She is an Advisor to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and to the United Nations Development Program on the issue of gender in the prevention of HIV/AIDS. She is one of the founders of “Oremi,” the first organization of lesbian and bisexual women in Cuba.

    Sponsored by the U.S. Women and Cuba Collaboration, Institute on Social Exclusion, Office of Global Affairs, Latino Student, Association, and Black Student Association.

    Contact Nataka Moore if you have questions.

  • Cuban Women’s Voices: Diverse Work of Three Cuban Feminists (+)

    4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Chicago Campus, Rm 16-100

     

     

    Noted Women Studies Scholar Dr. Norma Vasallo Baruetta, PhD is a Professor of Social Psychology and Women's Studies at the University of Havana, and Chair of the Women's Studies Department. She has been a central figure in the integration of multicultural gender studies perspectives in the curriculum at the University of Havana.

    Followed by a panel discussion with:

    • Gisela Arandia Covarrubias is an author and researcher on issues of race and identity based out of UNEAC, the Cuban Union of Artists and Writers. She has made many contributions through the course of a long career. She holds a degree in Journalism and has been a researcher and writer.
    • Norma Guillard Limonta is an adjunct professor at the University of Havana teaching psychology and gender, a leader of the Cuban Association of Psychologists. She is an Advisor to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and to the United Nations Development Program on the issue of gender in the prevention of HIV/AIDS. She is one of the founders of “Oremi,” the first organization of lesbian and bisexual women in Cuba.

    Sponsored by the U.S. Women and Cuba Collaboration, Institute on Social Exclusion, Office of Global Affairs, Latino Student, Association, and Black Student Association.

    Contact Nataka Moore if you have questions.

  • Monday, May 19, 2014

  • Social Exclusion Simulation (+)

    1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    Chicago Campus

     

     

    The Social Exclusion Simulation is a group experiential learning tool for increasing understanding of complex systems and how the structural barriers that comprise them work to block access to key rights, resources and opportunities for some members of society, rendering them “socially excluded.”

    2.5 C.E.U.’s will be offered to psychologists, counselors, social workers, marriage and family therapists, and interested non-psychologists. Please indicate this on your reservation request.

    Participants include students, faculty and staff of the Adler School, members of the greater Chicagoland community, anyone interested in learning more about social exclusion. Participants adopt authentic Chicago-based case histories of formerly incarcerated women and are tasked with re-entering society – finding a place to live, a job, healthcare and other necessities – in the face of structural and systemic barriers.

    Participant outcomes include:

    • An increased understanding of what structural and systemic barriers are and how they work to undermine opportunity and access.
    • Increased appreciation of practical limits of personal responsibility, agency, and choice.
    • Increased motivation to adopt attitudinal and behavioral changes in pursuit of social change.
    • Increased empathy for other marginalized groups.
    • Apprehend the shock and disappointment about roadblocks of re-entry.

    To register and for more information about the Social Exclusion Simulation, contact the Institute on Social Exclusion at ISE@adler.edu.

  • Saturday, April 26, 2014

  • The Greater Englewood Unity Day Clean Up and Celebration (+)

    9:45 AM - 2:00 PM
    Imagine Englewood IF, Chicago

     

     

    The Adler School Institute on Social Exclusion invites you to join us for a community service day.  The clean-up will take place in various locations in Greater Englewood. Check out the Englewood Portal for updates.

    • 10 a.m.-Noon: Neighborhood Clean up
    • Noon-2 p.m.: Commuinty Celebration at 69th Street & Emerald Street

    Meet at Imagine Englewood IF, 730 W. 69th Street, at 9:45 a.m.

    To join the team or donate supplies, please email Latrice Patrick.

     

  • Monday, March 24, 2014

  • Social Exclusion Simulation (+)

    6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    Chicago Campus

     

     

    The Institute on Social Exclusion (ISE) Social Exclusion Simulation (SES) is a powerful role-play exercise that allows participants to see more clearly the ways in which society’s systemic and structural barriers produce social exclusion for certain groups of people. The SES simulates social exclusion processes by replicating the experiences of formerly incarcerated women attempting to re-enter society following their release from prison.

    Participants include students, faculty and staff of the Adler School, members of the greater Chicagoland community, anyone interested in learning more about social exclusion. Participants adopt authentic Chicago-based case histories of formerly incarcerated women and are tasked with re-entering society – finding a place to live, a job, healthcare and other necessities – in the face of structural and systemic barriers.

    The SES is important because it helps participants understand the limits of personal responsibility and the critical role for social change initiatives.

    Participant outcomes include:

    • An increased understanding of what structural and systemic barriers are and how they work to undermine opportunity and access.
    • Increased appreciation of practical limits of personal responsibility, agency, and choice.
    • Increased motivation to adopt attitudinal and behavioral changes in pursuit of social change.
    • Increased empathy for other marginalized groups.
    • Apprehend the shock and disappointment about roadblocks of re-entry.

    To register and for more information about the Social Exclusion Simulation, contact the Institute on Social Exclusion at ISE@adler.edu.

  • Monday, March 03, 2014

  • Social Exclusion Simulation (+)

    1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    Chicago Campus

     

     

    The Institute on Social Exclusion (ISE) Social Exclusion Simulation (SES) is a powerful role-play exercise that allows participants to see more clearly the ways in which society’s systemic and structural barriers produce social exclusion for certain groups of people. The SES simulates social exclusion processes by replicating the experiences of formerly incarcerated women attempting to re-enter society following their release from prison.

    Participants include students, faculty and staff of the Adler School, members of the greater Chicagoland community, anyone interested in learning more about social exclusion. Participants adopt authentic Chicago-based case histories of formerly incarcerated women and are tasked with re-entering society – finding a place to live, a job, healthcare and other necessities – in the face of structural and systemic barriers.

    The SES is important because it helps participants understand the limits of personal responsibility and the critical role for social change initiatives.

    Participant outcomes include:

    • An increased understanding of what structural and systemic barriers are and how they work to undermine opportunity and access.
    • Increased appreciation of practical limits of personal responsibility, agency, and choice.
    • Increased motivation to adopt attitudinal and behavioral changes in pursuit of social change.
    • Increased empathy for other marginalized groups.
    • Apprehend the shock and disappointment about roadblocks of re-entry.

    To register and for more information about the Social Exclusion Simulation, contact the Institute on Social Exclusion at ISE@adler.edu.

     

  • Thursday, February 13, 2014

  • Social Exclusion Simulation (+)

    9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
    Chicago Campus

     

     

    The Institute on Social Exclusion (ISE) Social Exclusion Simulation (SES) is a powerful role-play exercise that allows participants to see more clearly the ways in which society’s systemic and structural barriers produce social exclusion for certain groups of people. The SES simulates social exclusion processes by replicating the experiences of formerly incarcerated women attempting to re-enter society following their release from prison.

    Participants include students, faculty and staff of the Adler School, members of the greater Chicagoland community, anyone interested in learning more about social exclusion. Participants adopt authentic Chicago-based case histories of formerly incarcerated women and are tasked with re-entering society – finding a place to live, a job, healthcare and other necessities – in the face of structural and systemic barriers.

    The SES is important because it helps participants understand the limits of personal responsibility and the critical role for social change initiatives.

    Participant outcomes include:

    • An increased understanding of what structural and systemic barriers are and how they work to undermine opportunity and access.
    • Increased appreciation of practical limits of personal responsibility, agency, and choice.
    • Increased motivation to adopt attitudinal and behavioral changes in pursuit of social change.
    • Increased empathy for other marginalized groups.
    • Apprehend the shock and disappointment about roadblocks of re-entry.

    To register and for more information about the Social Exclusion Simulation, contact the Institute on Social Exclusion at ISE@adler.edu.

  • Wednesday, February 05, 2014

  • Social Exclusion Simulation (+)

    6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    Chicago Campus

     

     

    The Institute on Social Exclusion (ISE) Social Exclusion Simulation (SES) is a powerful role-play exercise that allows participants to see more clearly the ways in which society’s systemic and structural barriers produce social exclusion for certain groups of people. The SES simulates social exclusion processes by replicating the experiences of formerly incarcerated women attempting to re-enter society following their release from prison.

    Participants include students, faculty and staff of the Adler School, members of the greater Chicagoland community, anyone interested in learning more about social exclusion. Participants adopt authentic Chicago-based case histories of formerly incarcerated women and are tasked with re-entering society – finding a place to live, a job, healthcare and other necessities – in the face of structural and systemic barriers.

    The SES is important because it helps participants understand the limits of personal responsibility and the critical role for social change initiatives.

    Participant outcomes include:

    • An increased understanding of what structural and systemic barriers are and how they work to undermine opportunity and access.
    • Increased appreciation of practical limits of personal responsibility, agency, and choice.
    • Increased motivation to adopt attitudinal and behavioral changes in pursuit of social change.
    • Increased empathy for other marginalized groups.
    • Apprehend the shock and disappointment about roadblocks of re-entry.

    To register and for more information about the Social Exclusion Simulation, contact the Institute on Social Exclusion at ISE@adler.edu.

  • Wednesday, November 13, 2013

  • Social Exclusion Simulation (+)

    1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    Chicago Campus

     

    The Institute on Social Exclusion (ISE) Social Exclusion Simulation (SES) is a powerful role-play exercise that allows participants to see more clearly the ways in which society’s systemic and structural barriers produce social exclusion for certain groups of people. The SES simulates social exclusion processes by replicating the experiences of formerly incarcerated women attempting to re-enter society following their release from prison.

    Participants include students, faculty and staff of the Adler School, members of the greater Chicagoland community, anyone interested in learning more about social exclusion. Participants adopt authentic Chicago-based case histories of formerly incarcerated women and are tasked with re-entering society – finding a place to live, a job, healthcare and other necessities – in the face of structural and systemic barriers.

    The SES is important because it helps participants understand the limits of personal responsibility and the critical role for social change initiatives.

    Participant outcomes include:

    • An increased understanding of what structural and systemic barriers are and how they work to undermine opportunity and access.
    • Increased appreciation of practical limits of personal responsibility, agency, and choice.
    • Increased motivation to adopt attitudinal and behavioral changes in pursuit of social change.
    • Increased empathy for other marginalized groups.
    • Apprehend the shock and disappointment about roadblocks of re-entry.

    To register and for more information about the Social Exclusion Simulation, contact the Institute on Social Exclusion at ISE@adler.edu.

  • Monday, October 28, 2013

  • Arrest Records as Barriers to Employment (+)

    1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    James R. Thompson Center (Assembly Hall, Concourse Level)

     

     

    The Adler School of Professional Psychology Institute on Social Exclusion, in collaboration with its co-sponsors, will host this Midwest summit for attorneys, policy makers, workforce development and employment agencies, human resource personnel, business groups, community organizations, community leaders and residents.

    The program will feature keynote speaker Chai Feldblum, Commissioner, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Panel presentations will examine:

    • Revised EEOC guidelines for employers in considering arrest histories in hiring decisions
    • Impact on juveniles and adults seeking jobs—especially in vulnerable communities with high arrest rates
    • Current legal action involving major employers and the EEOC guidance
    • Remedies and implications
    • Research findings on guidance application and its mental health impact in Chicago’s Englewood community

    Registration takes place noon to 1 p.m.; the program begins at 1 p.m.  The event is free and open to all, but RSVP required by October 21. Please click here to register. For groups of 10 or more, please contact ISE@adler.edu.

    Co-sponsored by Cabrini Green Legal Aid, Chicago Area Project, Chicago CeaseFire, Chicago Commission on Human Relations, Chicago Department of Public Health, Chicago Department of Family and Support Services, Chicago Jobs Council, Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce, Children and Family Justice Center, Cook County Board/President Toni Preckwinkle, Field Foundation of Illinois, FORCE/Community Renewal Society, Illinois Department of Corrections, Illinois Department of Human Rights, Illinois Department of Employment Security, Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice, Juvenile Justice Initiative, Legal Assistance Foundation of Metropolitan Chicago, LISC Chicago, Metropolis Strategies, Pierce Family Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Safer Foundation, Shriver Poverty Law Center, TASC (Treatment Alternatives for Safe Communities), Teamwork Englewood, Union League Club of Chicago, and W. K. Kellogg Foundation.

September 2014

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