Jon Rosenfield, M.A. '11 M.A. in Counseling Psychology

Read about Jon Rosenfield, M.A. '08 and his experience as a career service advisor and adjunct professor.

Read about Jon Rosenfield, M.A. '08 and his experience as a career service advisor and adjunct professor.

Jon Rosenfield graduated in 2011 with a Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology from Adler University. He is currently a Career Advisor at Loyola University Chicago, and an adjunct professor at Adler University. Jon also volunteers his time and expertise to provide career-building workshops to Adler students.

Q: Tell us about your work.
Jon:
As a Career Advisor with Loyola University Chicago (LUC), I help engage students and alums in critical self-assessment in relationship to their current ideas and future goals regarding their careers. In addition to providing instructional and career-research materials for students, I work with them to discover more about their own personalities, values, skills and interests, as well as to evaluate where these aspects of themselves come from, and how they would like to utilize them in the future. I also have the opportunity to work under an LCPC, and assist with the training of counseling and higher-ed practicum interns.

Q: What is your impact on the individuals or communities with whom you work?
Jon:
My goal in my job is to prioritize client’s critical evaluation of how they fit into the world, over “getting a job”. As one of Alfred Adler’s primary tasks of life, career plays a substantial, dynamic role in shaping who we are.

Q: How did your Adler University experience affect where you are today?
Jon:
Adlerian theory attracted me to the school, in its emphasis on personality and narrative. In particular, Adlerian perspectives on how differences in our early experiences and later life experiences can cause difficulty feels particularly relevant to young adult career development.

Q: Was there a particular Adler faculty member or experience as a student that has most influenced you, and why?
Jon:
In terms of my Adler experience itself, each of my faculty advisors played crucial roles for me. Dr. Mark Bilkey challenged me to grow both personally and as a professional, and Dr. Brian Price provided great encouragement in regards to my initial interest as career development as a venue for counseling practice.

Q: What career accomplishment have you found most fulfilling, or considered your greatest professional accomplishment?
Jon
: This last year I partnered with LUC’s psychology department to meet with all internship students to discuss their how their internship experience fit into their larger ideas about career development. Feedback has been tremendously positive from this project, and from a professional standpoint it has been gratifying to have not only students, but faculty recognize the value of my work.

Q: What is the single most important piece of career advice you can give someone in your field?
Jon
: Slow down and be open to new experiences – you don’t have to have your career planned for the next 30 years – it won’t happen the way you anticipate anyway.

Q: What advice can you give a student just joining Adler?
Jon:
Spend some time carefully considering what type of practicum experience(s) you want. These experiences are probably more crucial than coursework in narrowing your focus and shaping your near-term career development.

Do some informational interviewing with people who have roles you’re interested in. Don’t just ask what you could do next, ask about how they spend their time at work, what they do and don't like, what’s changed in their field, and what’s coming next. Try to find out more about what it means to be that type of professional.