Tanya Prewitt-White, Ph.D.

"My ambition is to communicate and demonstrate   
through my teaching the  interconnectedness of  
exercise, health, sport, society, family, politics,  
and every day life." 
-Tanya Prewitt-White, Ph.D.

"My ambition is to communicate and demonstrate
through my teaching the interconnectedness of
exercise, health, sport, society, family, politics,
and every day life."
-Tanya Prewitt-White, Ph.D.

Tanya Prewitt-White, Ph.D.
Training Coordinator and Core Faculty,
M.A. in Counseling: Specialization in Sport and Health Psychology program

In the classroom, my main objective is not only that students learn the material but also enjoy the experience of learning. When we ask young children why they play sport, often times we will get a response such as “because it is fun.” Unfortunately, it has been my experience that as sport participants progress they may respond to the same question very differently. An answer may be “because I have a scholarship on the line or because it is all I have ever done.” Somehow, somewhere along their sport career the enjoyment of sport was lost. Unfortunately, the same applies in the classroom. Naturally, we excel when we enjoy what we do. Therefore, my ambition is to communicate and demonstrate through my teaching the interconnectedness of exercise, health, sport, society, family, politics and every day life while making it enjoyable. I believe that by unveiling to students the importance and relevance of the topic matter to not only their careers but also their every day lives, they will desire an even greater understanding of the research and literature in the field.

I know we all have different communication styles depending on race, gender, socioeconomic status, abilities, as well as upbringing. I acknowledge students’ differences in the classroom and believe that each and every student has a positive contribution to bring to the class based upon his or her identity and/or experiences. Most importantly, I realize that students “do not care how much I know until they know how much I care.” I treat all students as human beings first and foremost and student second. I cannot teach a student anything until they believe that I care not only about the subject matter but also about him or her on a personal level. My philosophy on teaching is that it is a calling and a passion; and, until the day I no longer possess this passion, I will resolve to be the best educator I am capable of becoming.

Please email or call me (312.662.4329) if you have questions or would like more information about me.

Education

  • Ph.D., Sport Studies with a Specialization in Sport Psychology, University of Tennessee – Knoxville
  • M.S., Sport Studies with a Specialization in Sport Psychology, University of Tennessee – Knoxville
  • B.A., Exercise Science, Physical Education and Psychology, Carthage College

Professional Memberships

  • Association of Applied Sport Psychology
    • Newsletter Editor, Association of Applied Sport Psychology, (AASP; 2013 - present)
    • Women in Sport Special Interest Group Member, Association of Applied Sport Psychology (AASP; 2012 – present)
    • Anger in Sport Special Interest Group Member, Association of Applied Sport Psychology (AASP; 2010 – present)
    • Conference Abstracts and Proceedings Editor, Association of Applied Sport Psychology (AASP; 2008 – present)
  • National Association for Sport and Physical Education, (NASPE; 2010 – present)
  • Illinois Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, (IIAHPERD; 2012 – present)
  • National Association of Kinesiology and Physical Education in Higher Education, (NAKPEHE; 2007 – 2010)

Select Publications

  • Odenheimer, E., Buchanan, R., & Prewitt, T. (in print). Adaptations of Yoga: Jewish Interpretations. In R. Rein & D. Sheinin (Eds.), Muscling in on New Worlds: Jews, sport and the making of the Americas.
  • Carter, L. & Prewitt, T. (2014). Seeing, Being and Doing: Addressing Multicultural Competency in Applied Sport Psychology. Athletic Insight, 6(3).
  • Prewitt, T. (2012). [Review of the book The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business]. The Sport Psychologist, 26 (2), 470-471.
  • Fisher, L, Withycombe, J. & Prewitt, T. (2010). Putting One’s “Game Face” On: Media Representations of Female Athletes. The Moving towards Justice Series, National Association of Girls and Women in Sports Journal, 1(3), 1-20.
  • Prewitt, T. (2009). Sport Psychology: A Mode to Promote Peace between Girls in Israel. Performance Excellence Movement, 6(1), 9-13.

Select Presentations

  • Prewitt-White, T. (2014). Navigating the “Muddy Waters”: Ethical Guidelines for the Kinesiology Trained Sport Psychology Consultant. Oral presentation given at the Association of Applied Sport Psychology Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, October 2014.
  • Coumbe-Lilley, J. & Prewitt-White, T. (2014). Build It and They Will Come: Developing a Framework for Undergraduate Education in SEP. Poster presentation given at the Association of Applied Sport Psychology Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, October 2014.
  • Prewitt, T. (2013). The Reality of Today’s Female Exercisers: A Consultant’s Guide. Oral presentation given at the Association of Applied Sport Psychology Conference, New Orleans, Louisiana, October 2013.
  • Prewitt, T. (2012). Enhancing Coaches’ Relationships with Parents: One Conversation at a Time. Workshop given at the Chicago Sport Psychology Symposium, Chicago, IL, December 2012.
  • Prewitt, T. & White, C. (2012). Critical Issues of Diversity when Working with Students and Athletes. Oral presentation given at the AAHPERD National Conference, Boston, Massachusetts, March, 2012.