Douglas Whiteside, Ph.D. Chicago Campus

"I truly enjoy introducing students to the process of  
psychological and neuropsychological assessment, 
including both the strengths and weaknesses 
of assessment tools." 
- Douglas Whiteside, Ph.D.

"I truly enjoy introducing students to the process of
psychological and neuropsychological assessment,
including both the strengths and weaknesses
of assessment tools."
- Douglas Whiteside, Ph.D.

Douglas Whiteside, Ph.D., ABPP
Core Faculty, Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology Program

I truly enjoy introducing students to the process of psychological and neuropsychological assessment, including both the strengths and weaknesses of assessment tools. Most of my classroom experience and interest lies in courses related to assessment. In addition to formal classroom teaching, I have been very active in clinical supervision of students and trainees. For example, I have supervised numerous post-doctoral fellows and practicum students in psychological and neuropsychological assessments.

My teaching and supervision are influenced and informed by my direct clinical work, and I believe that the ability to draw on this clinical experience makes my teaching stronger. I have spent more than 17 years as a practicing neuropsychologist, and I enjoy bringing my experiences into the classroom to share with students. In my clinical work, I work with a diverse population of children and adults who present with many neurological and psychological issues, including dementia, traumatic brain injury, learning disorders, seizure disorders, multiple sclerosis, pervasive developmental disorders, and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, among others.

Graduate-level training in psychology is a high-level, integrative experience that is a dynamic process. Faculty cannot “spoon-feed” students a bunch of facts and expect them to be analytical thinkers. Students need mentoring, role-modeling, and examples so that they can develop their analytic and critical-thinking skills. It is my philosophy that doctoral-level psychology training should primarily focus on the acquisition of hig- level thinking and analytical abilities, with additional concentration on the development of clear communication of ideas and information, empirical approaches to understanding human behavior, and a high level understanding of intra- and interpersonal processes. Integrating theory learned in the classroom with empirical research and clinical experiences provides a strong foundation for clinical psychologists and neuropsychologists.

Please e-mail or call me (312-662-4346) if you have questions or would like more information about me.

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • M.A., University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • B.A., Marquette University

Professional Memberships

  • American Psychological Association (APA), Division 40-1994-present
  • International Neuropsychological Society (INS) 1990-present
  • National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN) 1990-present
  • American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) 2000-present
  • Midwest Neuropsychology Group (MNG) 2011-present

Select Publications

  • Whiteside, D.M., Turnbull, J., Galbreath, J., & Brown, M. (2012). Differential response patterns on the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) in compensation seeking and non-compensation seeking mild traumatic brain injury patients. Manuscript online December 2, 2011 in The Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology.
  • Whiteside, D.M., Wald, D., Busse, M. (2011). Classification accuracy of multiple visual spatial measures in the detection of suspect effort. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 25, 287-301.
  • Whiteside, D. M., Hellings, J., & Brown, J. (2010a). The impact of left temporal lobe seizure disorder on learning disorder: A case study. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 24, 1026-1044.
  • Whiteside, D. M., Zimberoff, A., Stroemel, J., Clinton, C., White, C., Diamonti, C., & Waters, D., (2010b). Personality constructs on the Personality Assessment Inventory associated with suboptimal cognitive effort. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 24, 315-325.
  • Whiteside, D. M., Dunbar-Mayer, P., & Waters, D. (2009). Relationship between TOMM performance and PAI validity scales in a mixed clinical sample. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 23, 523–53.

Select Presentations

  • Whiteside, D.M., Wald, D.M., and Busse, M. (2011, February). Classification accuracy of the Benton Facial Recognition Test. Presentation at the International Neuropsychological Society Conference. Abstract published in The Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.
  • Whiteside, D.M., Galbreath, J., Turnbull, J., & Brown, M. (2011, February). Scale elevations of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) in mild traumatic brain injury. Presentation at the International Neuropsychological Society Conference. Abstract published in The Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.
  • Whiteside, D.M., Lobe-Busse, M., & Wald, D. (2010, June). Utility of the Judgment of Line Orientation Test as a Symptom Validity Test. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 24, 611. Paper presented at the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology conference, Chicago, Illinois.
  • Whiteside, D. M., Zimberoff, A., Stroemel, J., Clinton, C., White, C., Diamonti, C., Waters, D., & Dunbar-Mayer, P. (2009, February). Prediction of decreased cognitive effort utilizing the Personality Assessment Inventory clinical scales. Paper presented at the International Neuropsychological Society conference, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Whiteside, D. M., Dunbar-Mayer, P., & Waters, D. (2008, August). Relationship between TOMM performance and PAI validity scales in a mixed clinical sample. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 22, 748. Presentation at the American Psychological Association conference, August 2008. Boston, MA.

Awards

  • American Board of Professional Psychology/American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology-May 2001. Diplomate in Clinical Neuropsychology