Jerry Westermeyer, Ph.D. Chicago Campus

“I believe that dialogue, in which both teacher  
and students may learn from each other, 
is a key component of education.” 
Jerry F. Westermeyer, Ph.D.

“I believe that dialogue, in which both teacher
and students may learn from each other,
is a key component of education.”
Jerry F. Westermeyer, Ph.D.

Jerry F. Westermeyer, Ph.D.
Core Faculty, Psy.D. Program

I believe the aim of education is to invite participation that best develops strong, independent thinking, inspires individuals for continual learning and promotes social justice. The process of education should continue after graduation as students transcend both content and teacher over time. To best metabolize a discipline and become truly independent critical thinkers, students must, in part, both reject and accept (or take in) aspects of teachers and mentors.

I believe that dialogue, in which both teacher and students may learn from each other, is a key component of education. Consequently, I emphasize discussions in my class that focus on problem solving skills, listening and tolerating different interpretations and solutions. I believe that the highest form of scholarship involves paradox and so class dialogue should involve questions that imply two or more credible responses. In shared inquiry, a form of dialogue I use extensively in my classes, students are asked to respectfully listen to others and to support their interpretations with evidence and logic. I believe that diversity is best advanced by such authentic dialogue.

I also believe that research and science on one hand and clinical practice and social justice on the other hand are not inimical to one another – but rather serve each other. To best promote social justice and clinical training, a solid foundation in research and science is essential – and my heroes easily move in interdisciplinary and multiple spheres based on empirical science.

I teach at the Adler School because I love teaching and I believe in its students. In general, I find most Adler students motivated to learn and to help others. I consider it a privilege to teach such students.

Please e-mail or call me (312-662-4351) if you have questions or would like more information about me.

Education

  • Ph.D., Committee on Human Development, University of Chicago, 1982
  • M.A., International Relations, University of Chicago, 1974
  • B.A., Political Science and History, St. Mary’s College, 1968

Licensure

  • Licensed Clinical Psychologist (Illinois)

Professional Memberships

  • American Psychological Association
  • Midwestern Psychological Association
  • Society for Research in Psychopathology

Select Publications

  • Waters, D. P., Westermeyer, J. F., Gralewski, C., Schneider, M. F. & Warkentin, M. (2008). Lifestyle among abuse-reporting outpatients. The Journal of Individual Psychology, 64, 55–66.
  • Westermeyer, J. F. (2004). Predictors and characteristics of Erikson’s Life cycle model among men: A 32-year longitudinal study. The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 58, 29–48.
  • Westermeyer, J. F. (2001). Severity of psychosocial stressors scale. The Corsini encyclopedia of psychology and behavioral science, third edition, 4. (pp. 1498–1500). New York, NY: Wiley & Sons.
  • Westermeyer, J. F. (1998). Predictors and characteristics of mental health among men at midlife: A 32-year longitudinal study. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 68, 265–273.
  • Westermeyer, J. F. (1993). Schizophrenia. In P. Tolan and B. Cohler (Eds.), Handbook of clinical research and practice with adolescents. (pp. 359-385) New York, NY: Wiley & Sons.

Select Presentations

  • The PCMAD (Primary Care Mood and Anxiety Diagnoser): Noteworthy Briefs from the Field, PCMAD: A Self-Report Scale for Improved Detection of Mood and Anxiety Disorders, 15(5), 26–27, 2008

Awards

  • Adler School Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2008–2009
  • Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Psychology Research, Michael Reese Hospital, 1982–1983