Joshua Wolff, Ph.D. Chicago Campus

"I am particularly interested in working with students   
who want to learn more about child and adolescent issues,  
behavioral medicine/health psychology, and LGBTQ topics." 
 
– Joshua Wolff, Ph.D.

"I am particularly interested in working with students
who want to learn more about child and adolescent issues,
behavioral medicine/health psychology, and LGBTQ topics."

– Joshua Wolff, Ph.D.

Joshua Wolff, Ph.D.
Core Faculty, Psy.D. Program

My teaching philosophy is that of a “dual-learner” model, in which the instructor creatively teaches students new material, yet remains an active learner themselves in the process. I not only teach students, I learn from them as well. One of the most rewarding, yet most challenging aspects of teaching is facilitating students’ connection with course material. In order to facilitate this connection, students must see the learning process not as just “fact accumulation,” but as an active process of integrating new information with previously learned information and personal experiences. I use several strategies in order to achieve this goal, including connecting the material with current research and clinical issues, presenting material that may have direct relevance to social justice and ethical topics, stimulating discussion and introspection, using technology for multi-modal learning, and fostering hands-on experiences.

My clinical background specializes in pediatric clinical psychology. I completed my practicum in the Behavioral Sciences section and Neuropsychology program at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, where I worked in the Department of Hematology/Oncology. Next, I completed a pre-doctoral internship and two years of postdoctoral fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, where I completed rotations in Emergency Medicine, Neuropsychology, Behavioral Medicine, Inpatient Psychiatry, Medical Consultation Psychiatry, Solid Organ Transplant, and Pain Management. My research interests focus on the intersection of religion, spirituality, sexual orientation, and gender identity. I also spent a year in Washington, D.C., working on mental health and public policy for the Senate Health Policy Office, under the leadership of Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA). As a result, I strive to incorporate public health and policy discussions into my courses in the Psy.D. program.

I am looking forward to working with a bright, diverse student population at Adler who will become future psychologists and leaders in the field. I am particularly interested in working with students who want to learn more about child and adolescent issues, behavioral medicine/health psychology, and LGBTQ topics.

Please email or call me 312.662.4371 if you have questions or would like more information about me.

Education

  • Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Biola University
  • M.A., Clinical Psychology, Biola University
  • B.S., Psychology, University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point

Professional Memberships

  • American Psychological Association (APA)
    • Division 44: Society for the Psychological Study of LGBT Issues
      (Task Force on Religion)
  • Illinois Psychological Association (IPA)

Select Publications

  • Wolff, J., Stueland Kay, T., Himes, H. L., & Alquijay, J. (in press). Transgender and gender non-conforming student experiences in Christian higher education: A qualitative exploration. Christian Higher Education.
  • Wolff, J.R., Allen, K. D., Himes, H. L., Fish, A. E., & Losardo, J. R. (2014). A retrospective examination of completed GLBTQ youth suicides in the United States: What can be learned from written online media? Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, 18(1)3-30. doi:10.1080/19359705.2013.827607
  • Wolff, J., Himes, H., Miller Kwon, E., & Bollinger, R. (2012). Evangelical Christian college students and attitudes toward gay rights: A California university sample. Journal of LGBT Youth, (9)200-224. doi: 10.1080/19361653.2012.652892.
  • Wolff, J., Pak, J., Meeske, K., Worden, J.W., & Katz, E.R. (2011). Understanding why fathers become primary medical caretakers of children with life-threatening illnesses. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, (12)144-157. doi: 10.1037/a002239
  • Wolff, J., & Himes, H. (2010). Purposeful exclusion of sexual minority youth in religious higher education: The implications of discrimination. Christian Higher Education, (9)439-460.
  • Wolff, J., Pak, J., Meeske, K., Worden, J.W., & Katz, E.R. (2010). Challenges and coping styles of fathers as primary medical caretakers: A multicultural qualitative study. Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, (28)202-217.

Select Presentations

  • Wolff, J., & Stueland K. T. (2016, August). The intersection of religion & spirituality among transgender and gender diverse individuals in faith-based higher education. Symposium conducted at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (APA). Denver, Colorado.
  • Wolff, J. (2015, November). LGBTQ Evangelicals: Toward a scientific understanding of mental health and identity. Symposium conducted at the Annual Convention of the American Academy of Religion (AAR). Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Wolff, J. (co-chair), Yarhouse, M., Ryan, C., Stratton, S., Russell, G., Anderson, T., & Gonsiorek, J. (2014, August). Integrating identities: spirituality, religion, and sexuality. Symposium presented the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (APA).
  • Wolff, J. (chair), Himes, H., & Lingenfelter, J. (2013, July). Untold stories, unheard voices: LGBTQA experiences in religious higher education. Symposium presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (APA).
  • Wolff, J. (2013, February). Examining completed LGBTQ youth suicides and associated risk factors: What can be learned from the media? Invited address at psychology department colloquium of Rogers Williams University.