Lawrence Cull, Psy.D. Chicago Campus

"My philosophy as both educator and clinician is to   
encourage and challenge people toward their best  
selves, support them fittingly when they struggle,  
and help them appreciate and capitalize upon  
their successes." 
-Lawerence Cull, Psy.D.

"My philosophy as both educator and clinician is to
encourage and challenge people toward their best
selves, support them fittingly when they struggle,
and help them appreciate and capitalize upon
their successes."
-Lawerence Cull, Psy.D.

Lawrence Cull
Core Faculty, Psy.D. Program

People who enter a graduate program in clinical psychology tend to be naturally curious and inquisitive. I feel that my role as an educator is to foster and elicit exactly that inquisitive, curious nature. I want students to truly think, feel and live the rich tradition and exciting contemporary work happening in the field of clinical psychology. Theories and philosophies become salient ways of being when students and practitioners chose their outlook on life from an informed and meaningful perspective.  

Clinical psychology graduate school ought to offer just that opportunity: deep student engagement in the outlook and identity of the human service provider. I take it as my role to play a part in helping students develop personally relevant approaches to their work including perspectives on social justice, what it means to be a socially responsible practitioner in a world of diversity and plurality, and what it means to be connected to a profession such as clinical psychology. In my estimation, the profession of clinical psychology is truly humanistic in that it is actively engaged in answering the questions of what is meaningful to the human person and how might, in that regard, she or he be helped? I aspire to foster in my students that kind of humanistic perspective. ‘What is meaningful to people?’ ‘How can I help them?’

I have been fortunate to work with clinical psychology students over the course of more than a decade as both a clinical supervisor and educator. I appreciate the struggle burgeoning clinicians encounter as they mold themselves into competent, reflective, and informed practitioner-scientists. We learn through trial and error, and certainly students need support through such a challenging process. My philosophy as both educator and clinician is to encourage and challenge people toward their best selves, support them fittingly when they struggle, and help them appreciate and capitalize upon their successes. The process is ongoing and requires effort, dedication, and self-reflection. Faculty and clinical supervisors should serve as guides along that way. 

My current clinical and scholarship interests lie in the areas of psychotherapy integration, health psychology and mind/body medicine, and contemporary approaches to attachment and humanistic psychotherapy. Currently, I am particularly attuned to helping students and professionals navigate their work in a changing healthcare arena. My research interests are in exploring the collaborative needs and attitudes between mental health and other healthcare professionals.

Please e-mail or call me (312-662-4349) if you have questions or would like more information about me.

Education

  • Psy.D., Clinical Psychology, Illinois School of Professional Psychology
  • M.A., Clinical Psychology, Illinois School of Professional Psychology
  • B.A., Economics, Loyola University of Chicago

Professional Memberships

  • American Psychological Association
  • Society of Behavioral Medicine
  • Biofeedback Certification International Alliance

Select Presentations

  • Supervision Agreements. Summer 2013.
  • DSM 5: Somatic Symptom Disorders. Spring 2013.
  • Common Case Conceptualization. Fall 2012.