Rabiatu Barrie, Ph.D. Chicago Campus

"My goal is to create an environment that encourages   
confidence,  critical thinking, free discussion, and  
interaction, as well as, an  ambiance that is stimulating, 
timely, and fun." 
-Rabiatu Barrie, Ph.D.

"My goal is to create an environment that encourages
confidence, critical thinking, free discussion, and
interaction, as well as, an ambiance that is stimulating,
timely, and fun."
-Rabiatu Barrie, Ph.D.

Rabiatu E. Barrie, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Child and Adolescent Track, Psy.D. Program

My teaching philosophy is student centered and consistent with a learning facilitation model. A learning facilitation model stresses collaborative learning. I believe that an exemplary teacher empowers students, by giving them important information, skills and opportunities to participate in scholarly discourse. Given the rate at which information changes or becomes obsolete, it is important for students to learn how to learn, develop critical thinking skills, and learn how to solve problems. My goal is to create an environment that encourages confidence, critical thinking, free discussion, and interaction, as well as, an ambiance that is stimulating, timely, and fun. I have a deep love and respect for the profession of teaching and it is with great honor and humility that I accept the mutability of its calling.

I approach research from a social justice and advocacy framework. My interest is in exploring the intersection of multiple identities such as race, gender, and class from a developmental perspective on both an individual and community level that are conceptualized and interpreted within a systemic context. More specifically, I am interested in how racism, trauma and violence affect the development of Black masculinity.

My primary goal is to investigate how gendered racial socialization processes affect outcomes such as academic achievement, academic motivation, social competence, emotional regulation, career aspirations, self-efficacy, and conceptualization of intimate relationships. Towards this goal, I am engaged in designing and conducting projects to explore how African American adolescent boys are socialized to cope with racism and racist encounters and experiences. My program of research also includes development of interventions and prevention programming that can be implemented in schools, juvenile justice settings, and other community organizations.

As a practitioner, I am a child and adolescent psychologist with specialized training and expertise in treating children who have been exposed to and/or are victims of trauma (sexual, physical, neglect, and neighborhood violence). My specialized training includes providing psychological, neuropsychological, and trauma assessment batteries to children and adolescents.

My personal charge as a core faculty member at Adler is to provide a supportive and stimulating environment where students can learn and grow into their identity as advocates for change, facilitators of healing, consumers of information, and creators of knowledge.

Please email or call me (312.662.4372) if you have questions or would like more information about me.

Education

  • Ph.D., Counseling Psychology, Loyola University Chicago
  • M.A., Clinical Psychology, Chicago School of Professional Psychology
  • B.S., Psychology, The Florida State University

Professional Memberships

  • American Psychological Association
  • Association of Black Psychologists
  • National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Select Publications

  • Thomas, A. J., Barrie, R., Brunner, J., Clawson, A., Hewitt, A., Jeremie?Brink, G., & Rowe?Johnson, M. (2014). Assessing critical consciousness in youth and young adults. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 24(3), 485-496. doi: 10.1111/jora.12132.
  • Thomas, A., Barrie, R.E. (accepted). Book review: Is marriage for White people? Journal of Family Theory & Review.
  • Thomas, A., Barrie, R.E., Tynes, B. (2009). Intimate relationships of African Americans. In  Neville, H., Tynes, B., Utsey, S. (Ed), Handbook of African American Psychology (pp.117-126). Sage Publications: Thousand Oaks, CA.

Select Presentations

  • Barrie, R.E., Hewttit, A., Whetstone, T. (2011). Developmental Examination of Gendered-Racial Identity Experiences of Black Men. Symposium at APA Convention in Washington DC.
  • Barrie, R.E., Hewitt, A., Pruitt, K., Whetsone, T., Jeremie-Brink, G. (2011). Promoting Resilience and Identity Development in Manhood. Workshop at Winter Roundtable Teacher’s College Columbia in NY, NY.
  • Barrie, R.E., Hewitt, A, Thomas, A. (2009). Stereotypical roles and psychological distress and well-being for African-American Girls. Poster presentation at APA Conference in Toronto, CA.
  • Hewitt, A., Hacker, J., Jeremie-Brink, G., Barrie, R.E. (2010). Stereotypical roles and academic achievement outcomes in African American girls. Poster Presentation at Winter Roundtable Conference. Teacher’s College at Columbia University in New York, NY.