Decriminalization of Communities

Meeting public safety challenges 
with socially just solutions.

Meeting public safety challenges
with socially just solutions.

Detention is Not the Solution

This project boldly tells the stories of people who have been adversely impacted by prison or immigrant detention. In so doing, IPSSJ draws attention to the current era of 'mass detention' in the United States. To watch these stories, click here. If you or your organization have additional stories you would like to share, please email the IPSSJ.
 
In addition to promoting people's stories, IPSSJ has organized multiple public events that revelaed the dangers of both mass incarceration and increasingly punitive immigration policies. Throughout the 2011-2012 school year, we held numerous events under the theme 'The Year of the Immigrant' that featured policy experts, law enforcement leaders, as well as grassroots organizers. This year of events culminated in the 'Forced Out' public forum where over 50 organizations and 600 people came together to explore the connections between immigration and criminal justice policies in the United States. To learn more about these events, click here.

Human Potential Reclamation

When we criminalize communities, we are making our world less safe. Why? Because we are erasing the potential of people who, with the right resources opportunities, could be major positive contributors to our society. In order to help the world see and reclaim this lost potential, IPSSJ is working with partners across Chicago and Illinois to promote positive investments in places that have been largely abandoned by constructive outside efforts.
 
In our juvenile justice work, we are currently helping to lead the Cook County Juvenile Justice Task Force. This coalition is made up of like-minded organizations from across Chicagoland who belief that our most marginalized youth need more resources to realize their full potential in life. Working together, we are calling for the strategic reinvestment of Cook County's juvenile detention budget towards the establishment of stronger youth services and programs in the areas of highest need.

ACES = The Science Behind Decriminalization

Childhood traumas have incredible, lasting influences in the lives of people, families, and communities. By promoting public awareness about these influences, through the Adverse Childhood Experiences framework, IPSSJ is helping systems leaders and policymakers to take a more enlightened approach to their work. In 2012, Elena Quintana gave numerous public presentations on ACES and IPSSJ joined together with peer organizations to have the ACES questionaire included in an annual survey by the Illinois Department of Public Health. Moving forward - through research, writing, and presentaions - we will continue to promote the need for public safety policies that fully account for the impact of trauma in our daily behavior and interactions.