Projects

Envision a society in which all 
communities benefit from key rights, 
resources, and opportunities.

Envision a society in which all
communities benefit from key rights,
resources, and opportunities.

Projects

In progress:

Health Impact Assessment: Proposed Redevelopment of Decommissioned Fisk and Crawford Coal Power Plant Sites
Funding support provided by the Chicago Community Trust

The Institute on Social Exclusion is conducting a health impact assessment (HIA) in conjunction with leaders in Chicago’s Pilsen and Little Village communities to examine recommended land use options for the decommissioned Fisk and Crawford coal power plant sites in those communities. Examining potential mental and physical health implications, the study will provide community-informed recommendations on land use—which will affect community health for years to come.

Community-Supported Violence Prevention Strategy:
A Contextual Assessment of Drivers of Community Violence

Funding support provided by the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority and LISC Chicago

The Institute on Social Exclusion partnered with the Quad Communities Development Corporation (QCDC), in collaboration with Washington Park Consortium, South East Chicago Commission, and the Chicago Area Project, to conduct community research that identified individual, community, and societal factors that contribute to high levels of violence in Chicago’s Grand Boulevard, Kenwood, and Washington Park neighborhoods.

Our data helped create a violence prevention strategy, and the project catalyzed our partners to collaborate as the Community Violence Prevention Collaborative working with community residents to mobilize, organize, and reduce violent behaviors toward youth, adults, and seniors.

Report: "Community-Supported Violence Prevention Strategy: A Contextual Assessment of Drivers of Community Violence."

Mental Health Impact Assessment: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Policy Guidance: A Mental Health Impact Assessment
Leading support provided Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Pierce Family Foundation.

The ISE pioneered the United States’ first Mental Health Impact Assessment (MHIA), leading a public-private MHIA research team that examined federal policy guidance on arrest records and hiring, and its impact on mental health of residents of Chicago’s Englewood community.

Environmental, economic and physical health effects are often considered when shaping public policy. However, mental health—an essential aspect of healthy communities—is rarely considered. MHIA ensures that community and individual mental health impacts are evaluated before enacting policy decisions.

Report: “U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Policy Guidance: A Mental Health Impact Assessment.”

Infographic: Why Does MHIA Matter?