M.A. Forensic Mental Health Leadership/ M.A. Rehabilitation Counseling

M.A. Forensic Mental Health Leadership /  
M.A. Rehabilitation Counseling  

M.A. Forensic Mental Health Leadership / 
M.A. Rehabilitation Counseling  

M.A. Forensic Mental Health Leadership / M.A. Rehabilitation Counseling

Overview

  • Stand out in the job market with a unique dual degree that offers training in rehabilitation counseling and forensic mental health leadership —all with a focus on social justice.
  • Meet growing demand for counselors and empower those with disabilities as well as working within specialized forensic settings with individual’s with specialized needs.
  • Train with expert faculty in small classes designed to foster collaboration and community.
  • Gain extensive hands-on experience with a unique focus on socially responsible practice.

Our M.A. in Forensic Mental Health Leadership / M.A. in Rehabilitation Counseling prepares graduates to improve quality of life for individuals who face physical, behavioral, developmental, and emotional challenges. Trained to confront systemic barriers and increase opportunities for inclusion, our graduates are well equipped to empower populations such as the elderly, veterans, and people with disabilities in a wide range of settings. The forensic distinctions offered in the dual degree program will also prepare graduates to work as mental health counselors with individuals, families and systems that interface with the legal and criminal justice arena. Our aim is to prepare clinicians who will be able to assess, treat, consult and apply a full array of counseling services in forensic and correctional settings.

The dual degree option also uniquely qualifies graduates to conduct specialized evaluations and provide expert witness and consultant services to the courts in a variety of civil litigation venues, including: personal injury; product liability; Worker’s Compensation; Social Security disability; employment law; discrimination; catastrophic injury with a Life Care Plan; professional malpractice; divorce; wrongful death of an adult or child; and other related areas.

Our immersive learning environment prepares students to work not only with individuals with disabilities, but also communities in addressing challenges stemming from disability, including employers, family members, education professionals, and others. Our Rehabilitation Counseling training revolves around three core elements: ethical behavior, diversity or individual differences, and critical thinking. Rigorous coursework and real-world experience focus students on creating positive social change—all led by experts in the field.

Professional Development & Training

Gain the knowledge and skills to create real change with small, collaborative classes taught by leading practitioners and scholars in the field of rehabilitation counseling. Our diverse faculty brings together classroom learning with individualized mentorship and hands-on professional experience.

Unique to our institution is the Social Justice Practicum, a nonclinical experiential practicum completed by all Adler students to cultivate the skills for becoming agents of social change. Working with our network of hundreds of community partners, students develop the practical knowledge and understanding of what it means to engage with communities and be a socially responsible practitioner.

Students also complete extensive field training, which provides opportunities to develop professional counseling skills working with individuals with disabilities in a variety of medical facilities, clinics, rehabilitation centers, private practices, community organizations, and government agencies. This training consists of a 100-hour practicum and a 600-hour internship, typically at the same site.

In the dual degree program, our specialized courses in forensic mental health leadership also prepare students to pursue national certification as a Forensic Mental Health Evaluator through The National Board of Forensic Evaluators. All faculty members are active in their respective areas of expertise and engage with students to promote opportunities for professional development in the field as well as at state and national conferences.

Accreditation, Licensure & Certification

Adler’s M.A. in Rehabilitation Counseling program is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body which is a requirement for licensure in many states. 

Graduates of the program are also eligible to take part in the National Certified Counselor (NCC) credential, after successful passage of the National Counselor Examination (NCE) and completion of required experiences.

In particular, graduates of the program are eligible to apply for the following credentials:

  • Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC), a nationally recognized credential.
  • The Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) credential in the state of Illinois.
  • The Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) credential in Illinois, upon completing all necessary post-graduate training and supervised experiences.

We offer specialized courses in forensic mental health leadership and specialized practicum experiences to promote certification eligibility to pursue national certification as a Forensic Mental Health Evaluator through The National Board of Forensic Evaluators.

Faculty members are active in their respective areas of expertise and engage with students to promote opportunities for professional development in the field as well as at state and national conferences.

Careers

Our program is designed to prepare rehabilitation counselors to provide evaluation, personal and vocational counseling, and support for independent living in a wide range of settings. Our graduates are also uniquely qualified to work in settings that utilize the study and practice of forensic and correctional counseling including state and federal correctional facilities, juvenile detention centers, substance abuse assessment and treatment facilities, court clinics, secured forensic units, community settings, and child advocacy centers.