In the News

NPR Report: Forensic Counseling Program Director Discusses Assault Effects, #MeToo 12.20.17
NPR Report: Forensic Counseling Program Director Discusses Assault Effects, #MeToo
12.20.17

The head of Adler University’s forensic psychology program shed light on the lasting impacts of sexual assault in a recent NPR report in which Illinois women shared their own “me too” stories.

Michael Davison, a psychologist who works not just with survivors, but their perpetrators, says there's a range of emotions — anxiety, shock, disbelief, confusion — that women may feel when verbally or physically assaulted.

The ramifications include higher rates of disability claims, more missed days at work and an array of other health-related issues.

"Being under that kind of pressure-cooker situation has a toll on one's physical health," he told NPR.

Davison serves as the director of the Adler University Chicago Campus Master of Arts in Forensic Counseling program.

Read more about his work, and find the full NPR article, Illinois Women Tell Their #Metoo Stories, online.

About Adler University

Adler University educates students to engage the world and create a more just society. Established in 1952, it enrolls more than 1,400 students in master’s and doctoral programs for social change through its campuses in downtown Chicago and Vancouver, as well as an Online Campus. Adler University’s mission is to continue the pioneering work of Alfred Adler, the first community psychologist, by graduating socially responsible practitioners, engaging communities and advancing social justice.