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Institutes + Centers

Adler Community Health Services

About

About

Adler University’s mission is to graduate socially responsible practitioners, engage communities, and advance social justice. Since 1972, Adler University has expanded access to mental health services for underserved communities through its clinical training programs. Student-clinicians of Adler University have provided these critical services under the direct supervision of licensed clinicians and supervisors ensuring quality of care while training the next generation of practitioners. The first mental health clinic of Adler University was the Dreikurs Psychological Services Center that was located on the university’s Chicago campus. In 2010, the on-campus clinic was innovated into Adler Community Health Services (ACHS) –a community-embedded service model whereby services would occur in the communities most in need of mental health care. This model alleviates community members from the undue burden of traveling for needed services while ACHS’ student-clinicians learn first-hand the social contexts of those they treat providing a deeper educational and clinical experience. This realignment to community-embedded services allows ACHS to be guided by the community itself in its service as mental health practitioners and agents of social change.

Funding Model and Core Services

ACHS does not profit from its clinical training partnerships. ACHS charges a per-day-of-service fee versus a fee-for-service model. This allows partners access to a broad menu of clinical services for one set per-day fee versus a traditional per-use charge for each service thus broadening access to critical services. The menu of clinical services for each contracted day are: coordination of care, orientation to ACHS services, individual therapy, couple and family therapy, group therapy, psychological assessment, community crisis intervention, mental health crisis evaluation and intervention of ACHS clients, staff training, and staff consultation.

As socially-responsible practitioners, ACHS is committed to seeking alternative funding in the form of government and foundation grants, and individual and/or corporate donations. ACHS, in partnership with Adler University’s Office of Institutional Advancement, explores fundraising opportunities that will pay for the contract fees of our clinical training partners. If ACHS secures funding that covers a partner’s contract fee, ACHS adjusts the contract terms to decrease or eliminate the unpaid portion of the contract due from the partner that the new funding now covers. ACHS asks our partners to submit a letter us as to how the partner reinvested the funds they would have paid ACHS into their community/agency. ACHS submits this letter to the funder to demonstrate the additional impact their gift provided to our community partner.

Structure

Adler University is a nonprofit educational institution. As one of the University’s community engagement entities, ACHS does not profit from the services it provides.

Contact ACHS

To explore partnership opportunities, or to request a community health services consultation, please email Dr. Kevin Osten-Garner, Executive Director.

Division of Juvenile Justice Internship Admission, Support, and Initial Placement Data

Click here for information on the aggregate post-doctoral positions of the previous three intern year cohorts.

Click here for the internship program admission requirements.

Click here for the internship program financial and benefit support.

Division of Community Health Internship Admission, Support, and Initial Placement Data

Click here for information on the aggregate post-doctoral positions of the previous three intern year cohorts.

Click here for the internship program admission requirements.

Click here for the internship program financial and benefit support.

Division of Community Health

Division of Community Health

The Division of Community Health within Adler Community Health Services (ACHS) provides extensive clinical behavioral health services to individuals, couples, families, and groups. Services are primarily provided by a multidisciplinary team of master- and doctoral-level graduate students supervised by licensed clinicians (psychologists and marriage and family therapist).

Our Training Programs
  • Post-Doctoral Residency
  • Community Mental Health Internship
  • Therapy and Advance Therapy Externships (MA and PSYD)
  • Assessment Externship (PSYD)
Our Services

ACHS provides clinical and community mental health services informed by the core values of Adlerian theory and the mission of Adler University. We work with and train clinicians who promote, engage and advance socially responsible practice, thereby engaging communities and advancing social justice. Through rigorous training standards and program evaluation, ACHS excels as a leader in the provision of community health services.

Internship Admission, Support, and Initial Placement Data

Click here for information on the aggregate post-doctoral positions of the previous three intern year cohorts.

Click here for the internship program admission requirements.

Click here for the internship program financial and benefit support.

Division of Juvenile Justice

Division of Juvenile Justice

The Division of Juvenile Justice Illinois within Adler Community Health Services (ACHS) provides extensive clinical behavioral health services and consultation to the youth and those involved in the youth’s care and custody at the Illinois Youth Center in St. Charles, IL, as well as youth and families in the community through Youth Outreach Services in Chicago, IL. Services are primarily provided by a team of doctoral-level graduate students supervised by licensed clinical psychologists.

Our Training Programs
  • Adler Juvenile Justice Internship  Click here for the 2020-2021 Internship Brochure to learn about the training experience
  • Psy.D. Therapy and Advanced Therapy Externships
  • Post-Doctoral Residency
Our Services

ACHS provides clinical and community mental health services informed by the core values of Adlerian theory and the mission of Adler University. We work with and train clinicians who promote, engage and advance socially responsible practice, thereby engaging communities and advancing social justice. Through rigorous training standards and program evaluation, ACHS excels as a leader in the provision of community health services.

Adler Juvenile Justice Internship

Adler Juvenile Justice Internship Program Goal

The primary objective of Adler Community Health Services’ (ACHS) American Psychological Association (APA)-accredited Adler Juvenile Justice Internship Program (AJJI) is to prepare interns for entry level clinical psychology practice who are grounded in the foundational scientific knowledge of the profession and who have applied functional skills for competent practice. A second and related objective is to prepare interns for entry-level practice that integrates socially responsible practice skills and an appreciation of social justice issues. Upon completion of the internship program, interns will have developed proficiency in key areas of clinical intervention, diagnostic assessment, professional development, multicultural issues, and professional ethics and standards.

The program is a collaboration between Adler University and the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice and Youth Outreach Services. ACHS provides behavioral health services to incarcerated male youths at the Illinois Youth Center in St. Charles, IL, and at-risk youth in the community through Youth Outreach Services.

The Adler Juvenile Justice Internship Program at Adler Community Health Services is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), and is a member of the Association of Psychology Post-Doctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC).

Program Outcomes

Upon completion, Adler Juvenile Justice Interns are expected to demonstrate:

  • entry-level competence in effective relationships as a means of engaging and helping other;
  • entry level competence in consultation, diagnostic and assessment, and intervention skills;
  • entry-level competence in clinical supervision and management of professional activities;
  • entry-level competence in the knowledge, respect and sensitivity for individual and cultural diversity dimensions and integration of intersectionality in clinical practice;
  • appreciation for holistic understanding of individuals and competency applying contextual, systemic and structural influences on health and well-being into clinical assessment and interventions;
  • commitment to the highest standards of professional ethics; and
  • understanding and application of the local clinical scientist model

Click here for the Adler Juvenile Justice Internship program brochure.

Internship Training Details

The APA-accredited Adler Juvenile Justice Internship (AJJI) offered at Adler Community Health Services’ Division of Juvenile Justice Illinois (DJJI) is affiliated with Adler University.  The AJJI training team includes the Director of Training (DJJI), two licensed clinical psychologists (DJJI), and the Mental Health Clinic Treatment (Unit) Administrator (TUA) who is a licensed psychologist.  The TUA collaboratively works with the DJJI Director of Training to coordinate the AJJI within the Mental Health Clinic at the Illinois Youth Center located in St. Charles, IL. The TUA is the head of the mental health services department within the facility and ensures the smooth functioning of all clinical services and collaboration between AJJI and the Illinois Youth Center. The DJJI Director of Training (DoT) and DJJI licensed clinical psychologists are the primary supervisors conducting clinical supervision and training for AJJI program interns.

Additionally, licensed staff psychologists at the Illinois Youth Center are also available to provide additional supplementary consultation, role modeling, and support for the interns (known as adjunct staff). These adjunct staff psychologists are not directly responsible for AJJI program requirements and do not have primary responsibility for intern training, supervision and program development. Interns work and interact regularly with these adjunct staff psychologists who serve as a professional and collegial resource. Through the AJJI experiences, interns develop proficiency in the nine profession-wide competencies outlined in Section II.B.1.b. of the Standards of Accreditation. The primary objective of the AJJI program is to prepare interns to become entry-level health service psychologists.

Interns offer clinical services to the incarcerated youth at Illinois Youth Center – St. Charles. In addition to providing direct clinical service, interns receive individual, group, and peer supervision; participate in case disposition meetings; and attend didactic workshops and seminars. Interns also provide supervision to therapy externs when available and receive supervision on their supervision by an DJJI licensed clinical psychologist.

Services provided at Illinois Youth Center – St. Charles include individual, group, and family psychotherapy; crisis assessment and intervention; group therapy; brief therapy; treatment outcome assessment; personality and cognitive ability assessment; intake assessment; consultation; and psycho-educational programs.

The APA-accredited internship program offers three (3) full-time positions for Adler University students. The internship begins in September 1st and ends August 31st.

Intern Compensation

  • Stipend:  $28,352 per annum
  • Health Insurance
  • 10 paid vacation days
  • 10 sick days
  • Up to three audited courses (one per trimester)

Overarching Program Goal

The purpose of the AJJI program is training of doctoral interns for Health Service Psychologist in professional psychology. The program identifies two specific goals in this preparation.

The primary goal of the program is to prepare interns for entry level clinical psychology practice who are grounded in the foundational scientific knowledge of the profession and who have applied functional skills for competent practice. A second and related goal is to prepare interns for Health Service Psychologist that integrates socially responsible practice skills and an appreciation of social justice issues.

Training Model

Professional psychology has been defined by Adler University faculty as the application of psychological knowledge and skills to forward the improvement of the human condition in the broadest sense with an emphasis on the direct delivery of professional services, including the design, implementation, and evaluation of assessment and change strategies as they are applied to individuals, families, groups, couples and organizations.

The internship uses the scholar-practitioner model of training, as articulated by the National Council of Schools and Programs in Professional Psychology (NCSPP) as the base for its training program.

Consistent with the mission and philosophy of the Adler University and ACHS, the program gives interns an opportunity to explore the application of psychological knowledge and skills to help individuals, groups and families as well as the need for addressing systemic problems, developing increased awareness of social issues, working with underserved populations and fostering social change. To accomplish this, the internship program provides interns with sequential, cumulative, and structured learning experiences (described in detail in subsequent sections of this document). Through the program training curriculum and activities, interns develop proficiency in knowledge and skills across eight foundational areas of clinical psychology called Program Objectives- described in subsequent sections of this document) as well as the values and attitudes of the profession. The program follows a practitioner-scholar model outlined by the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology (NCSPP) with one additional area of training identified as socially responsible practice.

The values outlined in the mission are instilled through the practitioner-scholar model of training that includes integration of evidence based knowledge, development of applied practice skills and professional values. Throughout the training, values central to the socially responsive, intellectually honest practice of psychology are emphasized, including the following:

  • The integration of evidence based knowledge, skills, and values
  • The value of and responsibilities related to race/ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, religion and other aspects of individual and cultural diversity
  • The value and necessity for continued education and life-long learning, professional involvement, post-graduate training and personal and professional development
  • The value of individual responsibility, cooperation, and collaboration, the necessity of contribution to community, including the professional community, and the values and ethics of the profession of psychology

The internship program prepares interns for entry into the field of professional psychology by providing experiential training in the various aspects of professional practice. Interns learn about serving culturally diverse, under-served populations within a correctional setting through training and experience in the following areas:

  • Individual & group therapy
  • Family services (contacts, engagement, & therapy)
  • Psychological assessment (cognitive & personality)
  • Initial assessment, intervention, and treatment planning techniques;
  • Crisis Intervention;
    Individual and cultural diversity;
    Supervision; appropriate roles as both supervisor and supervisee; Consultation; with those both within and outside of the mental health profession;
    Community education and professional presentation;
    Communication, report writing, documentation and record keeping;
    In-service and scholarly training presentations;
    Integration of scientific foundations in all areas of practice;
    Evaluation skills in treatment efficacy, program evaluation, ongoing monitoring and assessment of professional activities; and
    Socially responsible practice, including the development of professionalism and ethics.

Interns are encouraged and mentored to:

  • View behavior (broadly conceived) as biologically, socially, and culturally embedded; appreciate the impact of systems, context and structure in health and well-being
  • Effectively apply psychology to the prevention and amelioration of human suffering and other human problems with respect and understanding of cultural and individual diversity
  • Focus primarily on the direct delivery of professional psychological services, broadly conceived
  • Assume the role of a competent professional to effect individual and systemic change
  • Commit themselves to the highest standards of professional ethics, lifelong learning, and professional development.
Program Outcomes/Training Outcomes

The internship program training is designed to prepare interns for Health Service Psychologist practice and develop profession wide competencies in the following areas:

  • Professional Values, Attitudes & Behaviors  Behave in ways that reflect the values and attitudes of psychology, including integrity, deportment, professional identity, accountability, lifelong learning, and concern for the welfare of others.
  • Engage in self-reflection regarding one’s personal and professional functioning; engage in activities to maintain and improve performance, well-being, and professional effectiveness.
  • Actively seek and demonstrate openness and responsiveness to feedback and supervision. Respond professionally in increasingly complex situations with a greater degree of independence as they progress across levels of training.

Assessment: Select and apply assessment methods that draw from the best available empirical literature and that reflect the science of measurement and psychometrics; collect relevant data using multiple sources and methods appropriate to the identified goals and questions of the assessment as well as relevant diversity characteristics of the service recipient. Interpret assessment results, following current research and professional standards and guidelines, to inform case conceptualization, classification, and recommendations, while guarding against decision-making biases, distinguishing the aspects of assessment that are subjective from those that are objective. Communicate orally and in written documents the findings and implications of the assessment in an accurate and effective manner sensitive to a range of audiences.

Intervention: Establish and maintain effective relationships with the recipients of psychological services. Develop evidence-based intervention plans specific to the service delivery goals. Implement interventions informed by the current scientific literature, assessment findings, diversity characteristics, and contextual variables. Demonstrate the ability to apply the relevant research literature to clinical decision making. Modify and adapt evidence-based approaches effectively when a clear evidence-base is lacking. Evaluate intervention effectiveness, and adapt intervention goals and methods consistent with ongoing evaluation.

Research/Evaluation:  
Demonstrate the substantially independent ability to critically evaluate and disseminate research or other scholarly activities (e.g., case conference, presentation, publications) at the local (including the host institution), regional, or national level.

Ethical & Legal Standards:  Be knowledgeable of and act in accordance with each of the following: the current version of the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct; Relevant laws, regulations, rules, and policies governing health service psychology at the organizational, local, state, regional, and federal levels; and Relevant professional standards and guidelines. Recognize ethical dilemmas as they arise, and apply ethical decision-making processes in order to resolve the dilemmas. Conduct self in an ethical manner in all professional activities.

Consultation & Interprofessional/Interdisciplinary Skills:
  Demonstrate knowledge and respect for the roles and perspectives of other professions. Apply this knowledge in direct or simulated consultation with individuals and their families, other health care professionals, interprofessional groups, or systems related to health and behavior.

Supervision/Management: Apply supervision knowledge in direct or simulated practice with psychology trainees, or other health professionals. Examples of direct or simulated practice examples of supervision include, but are not limited to, role-played supervision with others, and peer supervision with other trainees.

Individual & Cultural Diversity: An understanding of how their own personal/cultural history, attitudes, and biases may affect how they understand and interact with people different from themselves. Knowledge of the current theoretical and empirical knowledge base as it relates to addressing diversity in all professional activities including research, training, supervision/consultation, and service. The ability to integrate awareness and knowledge of individual and cultural differences in the conduct of professional roles (e.g., research, services, and other professional activities). This includes the ability apply a framework for working effectively with areas of individual and cultural diversity not previously encountered over the course of their careers. Also included is the ability to work effectively with individuals whose group membership, demographic characteristics, or worldviews create conflict with their own. Demonstrate the ability to independently apply their knowledge and approach in working effectively with the range of diverse individuals and groups encountered during internship.

Communication & Interpersonal Skills: Develop and maintain effective relationships with a wide range of individuals, including colleagues, communities, organizations, supervisors, supervisees, and those receiving professional services. Produce and comprehend oral, nonverbal, and written communications that are informative and well-integrated; demonstrate a thorough grasp of professional language and concepts. Demonstrate effective interpersonal skills and the ability to manage difficult communication well.

Supervision

Each intern is assigned two supervising psychologists. The intern will meet one hour per week for supervision with each of the two supervisors.

The psychologist supervisor of a case is the legal and ethical owner of the case. Interns may seek consultation with another psychologist, but all clinical decisions are the responsibility of the case psychologist supervisor.

The intern should make every effort to audio record therapy sessions. After the supervisor reviews the recorded session, the intern will erase the session. Session recordings are only permissible with informed consent.

Each intern will also provide supervision to 1 extern. The intern will also be required to audio record supervision sessions with their externs periodically, for use in the Clinical Supervision Seminar and for review by their Primary Supervisor.

Individual Supervision (1 hour with 2 different supervising psychologists): 2 hours weekly

  • Group Clinical Supervision: 1 hour weekly
  • Group Clinical Supervision of Supervision Seminar: 1 hour weekly

Regular Seminars

  • Ethics/Professional Development
  • Evidence Based Practices/Intervention
  • Assessment
  • Self-Care
  • Diversity

Other Meetings

  • Extern Supervision
  • Therapy Didactic Presentations to Externs
Applying for the Internship

All prospective interns should submit the following documents following the APPIC online application process and provide all data through the APPI form:

  1. Cover letter of intent summarizing interest in psychology, experience, training, internship training goals, and reasons for applying to the program
  2. APPIC Application for Psychology Internships (AAPI)
  3. Current curriculum vitae
  4. Official transcripts of all graduate work
  5. Letters of recommendation from at least three professionals who are familiar with you and your work, including two letters from clinical placement supervisors
  6. Eligibility from the applicant’s director of clinical training as specified on the AAPI form

Applicant Requirements

Applicants must have:

  • Passed Comprehensive Exams by the application deadline
  • Successfully defended their dissertation proposal by the ranking deadline
  • Completed a minimum of 400 APPI intervention hours
  • Completed a minimum of 100 APPI assessment hours
  • Completed at least 3 years of Psy.D. program

Selection Procedure

Applications are reviewed by the Training Director and training supervisors and rated on the applicant’s submitted materials and the team will determine the final applicants who will be invited to interview. Due to the novel coronavirus pandemic, and to support a safe and equitable process, all interviews will be done virtually. Those invited to interview will be interviewed by members of the training team, including the Training Director, training supervisors, current interns and the post-doctoral resident. After all interviews have been completed the Training Director consults with the training team to develop the rank list for submission to the APPIC match program. Internship offers are made in compliance with APPIC guidelines. All internship offers are conditional on successful completion of a required state background clearance and drug screening. The internship site agrees to abide by the APPIC policy that no person at this training facility will solicit, accept, or use any ranking-related information from any intern applicant. The AJJI program adheres to all Adler University, state, federal and local nondiscrimination policies.

Nondiscrimination Policy

The AJJI is committed to nondiscrimination and equal opportunity in its policies and procedures for recruitment, retention, and development of staff and interns regardless of race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, ability status, veteran status or other individual diversity in any aspect of services. No psychological services will be denied or restricted on the basis of age, race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, location or residence, marital status, physical or mental disability, health status, sexual orientation. Reasonable accommodations for staff, clients, and interns are made on the basis of physical and mental disability in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The Program abides by all Adler School of Professional Psychology non-discrimination policies as well as local, state, and federal regulations.

Internship Admission, Support, and Initial Placement Data

Click here for information on the aggregate post-doctoral positions of the previous three intern year cohorts.

Click here for the internship program admission requirements.

Click here for the internship program financial and benefit support.

 

Core Clinical Training Team
  • Kevin Osten-Garner, Psy.D., Executive Director
  • Cara Murphy, Psy.D., Director of Training
  • John Tirado, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist
  • Wendell Carpenter, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist
  • Kevin Whitson, Psy.D., Mental Health Treatment Administrator IYC
  • Margaret Hensley, LMFT, Youth Outreach Services, (Irving Park) Administrator
Accreditation

The Adler Juvenile Justice Internship Program at Adler Community Health Services is accredited by the American Psychological Association. The Commission on Accreditation of the APA can be contacted at:

Commission on Accreditation
Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
American Psychological Association
750 First St. NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
(202) 336-5979
[email protected]

General Principles and Policies

Nondiscrimination Policy

The AJJI is committed to nondiscrimination and equal opportunity in its policies and procedures for recruitment, retention, and development of staff and interns regardless of race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, ability status, veteran status or other individual diversity in any aspect of services. No psychological services will be denied or restricted on the basis of age, race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, location or residence, marital status, physical or mental disability, health status, sexual orientation. Reasonable accommodations for staff, clients, and interns are made on the basis of physical and mental disability in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The Program abides by all Adler School of Professional Psychology non-discrimination policies as well as local, state, and federal regulations.

Sexual Harassment Policy

Sexual harassment is not tolerated by the AJJI Program and all program staff and intern are expected to comply with the highest professional standards of comportment. If unwelcome sexual behavior occurs, or there are concerns that harassment may be occurring, the intern is encouraged to discuss the situation with his or her Supervisor, the Training Director and/or the MHC Treatment Administrator of the facility who will then take steps to address the situation in accordance with both AJJI and IDJJ policy.

Declaration of Inclusive Practices

Adler Community Health Services is committed to providing an inclusive learning, working, and clinical environment in which all aspects of diversity are respected, valued, and affirmed. We value and respect the unique perspectives and contributions of each discipline and strive for interprofessional practice and training. We unconditionally reject every form of bigotry, discrimination, hateful rhetoric, and hateful action, whether directed towards one’s ability, age, citizenship, culture, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, immigration status, military status, national origin, political views, religion, race, sex, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and spirituality. We endorse values of open and respectful discourse and exchange of ideas from the widest variety of class, clinical, cultural, intellectual, political, religious, and spiritual perspectives in pursuit of clinical excellence and training rigor. We uphold and practice with honesty and courage the examination of our biased beliefs, communications, and behaviors to actively counter our own discriminatory beliefs, communications, and behaviors. We approach the mistakes we will inevitably make with humility and openness to learning, and make amends at every opportunity. We commit to seeking individual and collective consultation and supervision in the areas of inclusive practices when we fall short. We pledge to use our privileged status(es) to pursue equity wherever possible within the scope and limits of our clinical and educational roles and responsibilities.

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Support ACHS in increasing access to mental health services for high-need patients through its community-embedded service model.

 

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