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Chicago | Doctorate

Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) in Clinical Psychology

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Program Overview

Adler University’s Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.) program trains clinical psychologists to become socially responsible clinicians who empower individuals and strengthen communities around the globe. Our nationally recognized program is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), and prepares students to promote health among society’s most vulnerable and marginalized populations.

Our program exceeds the national average with internship placement – during our 2020-2021 academic year, Adler University’s Psy.D. program had a 97% match rate with APA-accredited internships, and a 100% internship match rate overall.

Graduates from our Psy.D. program meet all qualifications for the national licensure examination, and the program meets requirements of the National Register of Health Service Psychologists as well as state licensure guidelines.

Our program is designed to prepare clinical psychologists to work in diverse settings such as government agencies, mental health centers, and private practice.

Emphases

Students enrolled in the Psy.D. program can choose an emphasis to focus on a specific area in clinical psychology. Students apply to an emphasis of choice during their first or second year of study. During their first year, students interested in pursuing an emphasis should become acquainted with admissions criteria for their emphasis of choice, meet with the emphasis coordinator during the first year in the program, and attend emphasis activities.

Emphasis Options:

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      You need a Bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution to enroll in Adler University programs.

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      Student Outcomes

      Click here for more detailed student admissions, outcomes, and other data.

      2020-2021 Internship Placement Data.

      Careers

      Our program is designed to prepare clinical psychologists to work in diverse settings such as:

      • Clinics and mental health centers
      • Outpatient care centers
      • Inpatient care centers and hospitals
      • Nursing and residential care facilities
      • Substance abuse and drug treatment centers
      • School-based programs
      • Military organizations and VA hospitals
      • Government agencies
      • Correctional and forensic sites
      • Academic and University settings
      • Private, group, and individual practices

      Graduates from our program meet all qualifications for the national licensure examination and our program meets the requirements of the National Register of Health Service Psychologists as well as state licensure guidelines.

      Professional Development & Training

      Learn from leading scholars, researchers, clinicians, and educators who provide individualized mentorship and connect you to unique professional development opportunities.

      Gain practical training through practicums and internships with the University’s network of hundreds of community partners, including clinics, hospitals, mental health centers, and government agencies. All students complete a final one-year full-time internship matching their clinical interests and can apply broadly to internship programs across the country.

      All Psy.D. students receive individual support by faculty dedicated specifically to overseeing students’ clinical training experiences. These program-training faculty at Adler meet with all Psy.D. students to help them prepare for the clinical practicum application process, from reviewing CV’s, to helping students develop their training goals, to guiding them toward selecting training sites.

      Adler University also offers two APA-accredited Doctoral internship programs through Adler Community Health Services (ACHS). The Community Mental Health internship at ACHS is exclusively for Adler University students and interns to provide clinical psychological services through local agency sites to children, adolescents, adults, and families in underserved communities. The program trains students to further the mission of Adler University by utilizing clinical knowledge and skills to strengthen communities, and become leaders of social change. Additionally, the second accredited internship, the Adler Juvenile Justice Internship is a collaboration with the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice and provides the opportunity to work in a juvenile corrections facility with adolescents in a state youth center.

      We are proud to congratulate our students who have matched to our ACHS internships, and all of our students who will launch into this final capstone training experience.

      Accreditation

      Adler University’s Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology program is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association.

      American Psychological Association
      Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
      750 First Street NE
      Washington, D.C. 20002
      Phone: 202.336.5979

      Curriculum

      Adler University’s Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.) is a 114-credit hour program. Doctoral courses are scheduled during all three terms in an academic year. Classes are offered on weekdays as well as weekends during morning, afternoon and evening hours. Students should take courses in the proper sequence to satisfy prerequisites for advanced courses and to prepare for practicum placements.

      Find course descriptions and more information in the Adler University Course Catalog here.

      Core Courses

      PSY 600 - Clinical Interviewing and Fundamental Skills (4 cr.)

      This course teaches entry-level doctoral students fundamental relationship, intervention, diagnostic, and interviewing skills using role-plays and other experiential activities to prepare for clinical work on practicum. The course covers intake and semi-structured interviewing, the mental status exam, treatment planning, and providing client feedback.

      PSY 623 - Life Span Development (3 cr.)

      Social, cultural, biological and psychological issues of prenatal life, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and aging are presented. Psychosocial development, cognitive functioning, life transitions, coping and adaptation, work and retirement, bereavement and related issues are explored.

      PSY 642 - Diversity and Individual Differences (3 cr.)

      This class is one of two courses foundational to understanding human behavior in context and examining the impact of diversity, power, and privilege. Diversity broadly defined, including aspects of individual and group identity such as age, gender, sexual orientation, culture, race, ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic status, and health/ability status, will be examined.

      PSY 645 - Ethics and Professional Development in Clinical Psychology (3 cr.)

      This course is designed to provide students with a solid foundation for the ethical practice of professional psychology. Students will learn the American Psychological Association Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the history of professional psychology and psychotherapy.

      PSY 648 - Psychopathology I (3 cr.)

      This course examines historical and conceptual issues in diagnosis and psychopathology, including how wellness is differentiated from pathology. The course examines dimensional versus categorical models, diagnostic validity, the DSM-5 and its predecessors, models of personality development, and the biopsychosocial model of mental illness.

      PSY 649 - Psychopathology II (3 cr.)

      This course is a continuation of PSY 648 with a focus on both the science of psychopathology and DSM-5 diagnosis.

      PSY 659 - Community Psychology (3 cr.)

      Students learn theory and research on the role of community psychology in treating problems related to a range of pervasive social justice issues that impact the health of individuals and communities. Community Psychology takes an ecological approach to human functioning, locating health and dysfunction in the interaction between individuals and larger social systems.

      PSY 661 - Integrative Assessment: Cognitive, Intellectual, and Academic Functioning and Required Lab (4 cr.)

      This course introduces students to the theoretical basis, psychometrics, ethics, and clinical application of cognitive and academic assessment. Cultural influences and diversity issues involving assessment procedures are emphasized, and classical and contemporary theories of intelligence are explored to provide students with a useful framework.

      PSY 662 - Integrative Assessment: Personality I and Lab (4 cr.)

      This course provides students with an overview of the conceptual, theoretical, empirical, and psychometric issues in clinical assessment through self-report, actuarial, and narrative approaches to the psychological assessment of personality and psychopathology.

      PSY 663 - Integrative Assessment: Personality II and Lab (4 cr.)

      This course provides students with an overview of the conceptual, theoretical, empirical, and psychometric issues in clinical assessment through the use of the Rorschach Performance Assessment System (R-PAS).

      PSY 709 - Diagnosis and Treatment of Addictive Disorders (3 cr.)

      This course is designed to provide an introduction to alcoholism, substance abuse, and other addictive disorders. Included is an overview of the information needed to assess along with the treatment models of addictive disorders.

      PSY 710 - Adlerian Therapy I: Introduction to Assessment and Case Conceptualization (3 cr.)

      This course covers the theoretical principles of Individual Psychology including striving, holism, phenomenology, teleology, and social interest. The course addresses the cognitive, affective, sociocultural dimensions of the individual’s development; the selectivity of perception in the formation of one’s worldview; motivational factors; creativity; and the indivisibility of the person.

      PSY 711 - Adlerian Therapy II: Psychodynamics of Psychopathology and Interventions (3 cr.)

      Adlerian II explores the psychodynamics of psychopathology and development and maintenance of symptoms given the recursive influence between society and the individual. Students will learn to connect the Adlerian conceptualization of psychopathology to the practical application of Adlerian approaches to psychotherapy.

      PSY 724 - Biological Bases of Behavior (3 cr.)

      The course objectives are to make the student aware of pertinent gross and microscopic human neuroanatomy, to build a foundational understanding of neurophysiology and the biology of the nerve, and to become familiar with a variety of clinical issues as they relate to neurophysiology.

      PSY 737 - Statistics (3 cr.)

      This course concerns concepts and applications of descriptive and inferential statistics and focuses on the statistical methods of data analysis, t-test, F-test, nonparametric statistics (Chi-square), the analysis of variance, multivariate analysis, and other techniques.

      PSY 738 - Quantitative Research Methods In Clinical Psychology (3 cr.)

      This course introduces various approaches to research design, methodology, and data analysis. Doctoral students’ clinical interests are integrated with information about a variety of research approaches, including theoretical and quantitative designs.

      PSY 739 - Qualitative Research Methods In Clinical Psychology (3 cr.)

      This course introduces students to the practice of qualitative research that is applicable to research and evaluation contexts in psychological practice. This course reviews the assumptions, theories, and processes of qualitative inquiry.

      PSY 832 - Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior (3 cr.)

      This course emphasizes the most recent theoretical developments in cognitive-affective bases of behavior. Areas of emphasis will include attention, memory, knowledge, language, reasoning, problem solving, the cognitive bases of affect and consciousness, human learning, and theories of motivation.

      PSY 833 - Social Psychology (3 cr.)

      This course provides an overview of the social-psychological cognition, perception, and behavior of individuals and groups.

      PSY 834 - History and Systems (3 cr.)

      A survey of the historical development of major theories, research, and practice in psychology is presented. Major systems of psychology are examined. In addition, the course is structured around a number of major philosophical issues and how major theories of psychology have understood and addressed these issues.

      PSY 835 - Social Determinants of Mental Health (3 cr.)

      This is an advanced course for understanding human behavior in social context. It will provide an understanding of the ways in which contemporary social forces, including globalization, impact health and well-being.

      PSY 910 - Supervision & Mgmt Clin Psych (3 cr.)

      This course, intended to occur late in the doctoral curriculum, during or just before the internship, focuses primarily on clinical supervision with secondary focus on clinical and programmatic consultation.

      PSY *** - Intervention Electives (two) (6 cr. total)

      See below for more information.

      PSY *** - Advanced Intervention Elective Credits (3 cr.)

      See below for more information.

      PSY *** - Another Intervention Elective from either category (3 cr.)

      See below for more information.

      PSY *** - General Electives (five) (15 cr. total)

      See below for more information.

      Qualifying Exams

      PSY 790 - Doctoral Clinical Qualifying Examination - Assessment Competency (0 cr.)

      This is a clinical competency examination focusing particularly on knowledge and skills in assessment required for entry-level practice as well as the ability to integrate science and practice and provide service in a socially responsible manner.

      PSY 890 - Doctoral Clinical Qualifying Exam - Intervention (0 cr.)

      This is a clinical competency examination focusing particularly on knowledge and skills in intervention required for entry-level practice as well as the ability to integrate science and practice and provide service in a socially responsible manner.

      Practica

      SJP 513 - Social Justice Practicum I (1 cr.)

      The Social Justice Practicum (SJP) is a first-year, nonclinical and non-discipline-specific experiential practicum that begins in the fall term. Students gain the knowledge, skills, and perspectives to utilize collective power and social justice strategies to build a more equitable society. The SJP is designed to help students learn how to work alongside different communities as agents of social change and serves as the catalyst for students to realize and understand their own strengths and responsibility to contribute to social equity.

      SJP 514 - Social Justice Practicum II (1 cr.)

      The Social Justice Practicum (SJP) is a first-year, nonclinical and non-discipline-specific experiential practicum that continues through the spring term. Students gain the knowledge, skills, and perspectives to utilize collective power and social justice strategies to build a more equitable society. The SJP is designed to help students learn how to work alongside different communities as agents of social change and serves as the catalyst for students to realize and understand their own strengths and responsibility to contribute to social equity.

      PSY 767 - Doctoral Practicum and Seminar I (1 cr.)

      Assessment Seminar is taken concurrently with the assessment practicum. This seminar provides a setting for the student to discuss and apply the fundamentals of clinical and diagnostic interviewing; to formulate DSM diagnostic impressions; to write an accurate assessment report based on data from the interview, mental status exam, and psychological test data; and to appreciate how diversity issues affect the content and processes of clinical interviewing and more broadly of psychological assessment.

      PSY 768 - Doctoral Practicum and Seminar II (1 cr.)

      Assessment Seminar is taken concurrently with the assessment practicum. This seminar provides a setting for the student to discuss and apply the fundamentals of clinical and diagnostic interviewing; to formulate DSM diagnostic impressions; to write an accurate assessment report based on data from the interview, mental status exam, and psychological test data; and to appreciate how diversity issues affect the content and processes of clinical interviewing and more broadly of psychological assessment.

      PSY 769 - Doctoral Practicum and Seminar III (1 cr.)

      Assessment Seminar is taken concurrently with the assessment practicum. This seminar provides a setting for the student to discuss and apply the fundamentals of clinical and diagnostic interviewing; to formulate DSM diagnostic impressions; to write an accurate assessment report based on data from the interview, mental status exam, and psychological test data; and to appreciate how diversity issues affect the content and processes of clinical interviewing and more broadly of psychological assessment.

      PSY 867 - Doctoral Practicum and Seminar IV (1 cr.)

      Therapy seminar is taken concurrently with the therapy practicum experience. This seminar provides students with an opportunity to review clinical cases integrating theory, practice, and research and discuss professional development and the supervision experience.

      PSY 868 - Doctoral Practicum and Seminar V (1 cr.)

      Therapy seminar is taken concurrently with the therapy practicum experience. This seminar provides students with an opportunity to review clinical cases integrating theory, practice, and research and discuss professional development and the supervision experience.

      PSY 869 - Doc Practicum and Seminar VI (1 cr.)

      Therapy seminar is taken concurrently with the therapy practicum experience. This seminar provides students with an opportunity to review clinical cases integrating theory, practice, and research and discuss professional development and the supervision experience.

      PSY 967 - Advanced Practicum and Seminar I (1 cr.)

      This advanced seminar is taken concurrently with an advanced practicum experience. The seminar provides students with an opportunity to review clinical cases integrating theory, practice, and research, and discuss professional development and the supervision experience.

      PSY 968 - Advanced Practicum and Seminar II (1 cr.)

      This advanced seminar is taken concurrently with an advanced practicum experience. The seminar provides students with an opportunity to review clinical cases integrating theory, practice, and research, and discuss professional development and the supervision experience.

      Seminars

      PSY 667 - Professional Develop and Social Responsibility I (1 cr.)

      This seminar provides first-year students with support for and orientation to becoming a socially responsible psychologist. The seminar focuses on personal and professional development to help students prepare to engage in clinical and community work, explore their personal and professional identity, and begin to understand the impact of diversity and social justice issues on their work.

      PSY 668 - Professional Development and Social Responsibility II (1 cr.)

      This seminar continues throughout the first year and provides students with support and orientation to becoming a socially responsible psychologist. The seminar focuses on personal and professional development to help students prepare to engage in clinical work, explore their personal and professional identity, and begin to understand the impact of diversity and social justice issues on their work.

      PSY 669 - Diversity Seminar (1 cr.)

      This seminar continues throughout the first year and builds on professional identity development and integration of socially responsible practice values and skills. In the last term of this seminar, students will continue to explore and integrate the personal and professional impact of working with diverse communities, drawing from their service-learning practicum experiences.

      PSY 750 - Doctoral Practicum Seminar I (1 cr.)

      Taken concurrently with the assessment practicum, this seminar provides a setting for the student to discuss and apply the fundamentals of clinical and diagnostic interviewing; to formulate DSM diagnostic impressions; to write an accurate assessment report based on data from the interview, mental status exam, and psychological test data; and to appreciate how diversity issues affect the content and processes of clinical interviewing and more broadly of psychological assessment.

      PSY 751 - Doctoral Practicum Seminar II (1 cr.)

      Taken concurrently with the assessment practicum, this seminar provides a setting for the student to discuss and apply the fundamentals of clinical and diagnostic interviewing; to formulate DSM diagnostic impressions; to write an accurate assessment report based on data from the interview, mental status exam, and psychological test data; and to appreciate how diversity issues affect the content and processes of clinical interviewing and more broadly of psychological assessment.

      PSY 752 - Doctoral Practicum Seminar III (1 cr.)

      Taken concurrently with the assessment practicum, this seminar provides a setting for the student to discuss and apply the fundamentals of clinical and diagnostic interviewing; to formulate DSM diagnostic impressions; to write an accurate assessment report based on data from the interview, mental status exam, and psychological test data; and to appreciate how diversity issues affect the content and processes of clinical interviewing and more broadly of psychological assessment.

      PSY 850 - Doctoral Practicum Seminar IV (1 cr.)

      Taken concurrently with the therapy practicum, this seminar provides students with an opportunity to review clinical cases integrating theory, practice, and research and discuss professional development and the supervision experience. Specific cases students are working on in their therapy practicum are discussed to illustrate general principles of therapy and intervention.

      PSY 851 - Doctoral Practicum Seminar V (1 cr.)

      Taken concurrently with the therapy practicum, this seminar provides students with an opportunity to review clinical cases integrating theory, practice, and research and discuss professional development and the supervision experience. Specific cases students are working on in their therapy practicum are discussed to illustrate general principles of therapy and intervention.

      Dissertation

      PSY 892 - Doctoral Dissertation I (0.5 cr.)

      The steps and requirements for adequate progress through the Dissertation sequence are more fully outlined in the Doctoral Dissertation Handbook. Students begin to register for the dissertation sequence at the beginning of their third year in the program.

      PSY 893 - Doctoral Dissertation II (0.5 cr.)

      The steps and requirements for adequate progress through the Dissertation sequence are more fully outlined in the Doctoral Dissertation Handbook. Students begin to register for the dissertation sequence at the beginning of their third year in the program.

      PSY 894 - Doctoral Dissertation III (0.5 cr.)

      The steps and requirements for adequate progress through the Dissertation sequence are more fully outlined in the Doctoral Dissertation Handbook. Students begin to register for the dissertation sequence at the beginning of their third year in the program.

      PSY 992 - Doctoral Dissertation IV (0.5 cr.)

      The steps and requirements for adequate progress through the Dissertation sequence are more fully outlined in the Doctoral Dissertation Handbook. Students begin to register for the dissertation sequence at the beginning of their third year in the program.

      PSY 993 - Doctoral Dissertation V (0.5 cr.)

      The steps and requirements for adequate progress through the Dissertation sequence are more fully outlined in the Doctoral Dissertation Handbook. Students begin to register for the dissertation sequence at the beginning of their third year in the program.

      PSY 994 - Doctoral Dissertation VI (0.5 cr.)

      The steps and requirements for adequate progress through the Dissertation sequence are more fully outlined in the Doctoral Dissertation Handbook. Students begin to register for the dissertation sequence at the beginning of their third year in the program.

      PSY 998 - Doctoral Oral Defense (0 cr.)

      Students defend their doctoral dissertation and must submit their dissertation for publication to complete the Doctoral Oral Defense. Students must submit the Certification of Preparedness form found in the Dissertation Handbook.

      Prerequisites: PSY 901-PSY 903 and permission of the Doctoral Dissertation Committee.

      Internship

      Students taken either PSY 920, PSY 921, and PSY 922 OR PSY 923, PSY 924, PSY 925, PSY 926, PSY 927, and PSY 928.

      PSY 920 - Doctoral Internship Full-Time (0 cr.)

      Following completion of academic and practicum requirements, doctoral students must complete an internship of a minimum of 2,000 clock hours of training over a 12- to 24-month period. Most internships require a one-year, full-time commitment. A two-year, half-time internship may also be obtained.

      PSY 921 - Doctoral Internship Full-Time (0 cr.)

      Following completion of academic and practicum requirements, doctoral students must complete an internship of a minimum of 2,000 clock hours of training over a 12- to 24-month period. Most internships require a one-year, full-time commitment. A two-year, half-time internship may also be obtained.

      PSY 922 - Doctoral Internship Full-Time (0 cr.)

      Following completion of academic and practicum requirements, doctoral students must complete an internship of a minimum of 2,000 clock hours of training over a 12- to 24-month period. Most internships require a one-year, full-time commitment. A two-year, half-time internship may also be obtained.

      PSY 923 - Doctoral Internship Half-Time (0 cr.)

      Following completion of academic and practicum requirements, doctoral students must complete an internship of a minimum of 2,000 clock hours of training over a 12- to 24-month period. Most internships require a one-year, full-time commitment. A two-year, half-time internship may also be obtained.

      PSY 924 - Doctoral Internship Half-Time (0 cr.)

      Following completion of academic and practicum requirements, doctoral students must complete an internship of a minimum of 2,000 clock hours of training over a 12- to 24-month period. Most internships require a one-year, full-time commitment. A two-year, half-time internship may also be obtained.

      PSY 925 - Doctoral Internship Half-Time (0 cr.)

      Following completion of academic and practicum requirements, doctoral students must complete an internship of a minimum of 2,000 clock hours of training over a 12- to 24-month period. Most internships require a one-year, full-time commitment. A two-year, half-time internship may also be obtained.

      PSY 926 - Doctoral Internship Half-Time (0 cr.)

      Following completion of academic and practicum requirements, doctoral students must complete an internship of a minimum of 2,000 clock hours of training over a 12- to 24-month period. Most internships require a one-year, full-time commitment. A two-year, half-time internship may also be obtained.

      PSY 927 - Doctoral Internship Half-Time (0 cr.)

      Following completion of academic and practicum requirements, doctoral students must complete an internship of a minimum of 2,000 clock hours of training over a 12- to 24-month period. Most internships require a one-year, full-time commitment. A two-year, half-time internship may also be obtained.

      PSY 928 - Doctoral Internship Half-Time (0 cr.)

      Following completion of academic and practicum requirements, doctoral students must complete an internship of a minimum of 2,000 clock hours of training over a 12- to 24-month period. Most internships require a one-year, full-time commitment. A two-year, half-time internship may also be obtained.

      Required Intervention Electives

      All Psy.D. students choose two.

      PSY 720 - Cognitive and Behavioral Therapy Approaches I (3 cr.)

      This course will examine basic concepts and applications of cognitive, behavioral, and cognitive-behavioral theories and therapies within the historical context of the prominent theories. Students will be introduced to theory, basic techniques, and evidence-based applications of various models.

      PSY 721 - Psychoanalytic Approaches I (3 cr.)

      This course is designed to provide an overview of the history and development of psychoanalysis, including but not limited to classical Freudian (drives, dreams, defenses, and transference) ego psychology, object relations (British and Middle Schools), self-psychology, relational, intersubjective, affect regulation (Allan Schore and colleagues), and mentalization (Peter Fonagy and colleagues) approaches.

      PSY 722 - Humanistic and Existentialist Therapy Approaches I (3 cr.)

      This course will examine basic concepts and approaches in the humanistic, existential, constructivist, and phenomenological schools of psychology (H-E). The course will cover theoretical models, conceptualization, and the historical relevance of H-E approaches relative to other major psychological theories/approaches.

      PSY 723 - Couple & Family Ther Appr I (3 cr.)

      This course introduces students to the major and evolving family and couples models. It will focus on theory and conceptualization, understanding the etiology and maintenance of presenting issues, basic techniques, and evidence-based applications for various models.

      PSY 799 - Military Couple, Family, and Group Psychotherapy (3 cr.)

      (Military Emphasis students only; meets the requirement of PSY 723)
      This course focuses on the treatment of military clients (including reserve and active duty, veterans, and retirees) and their families. The treatment modalities will be explored in the context of individual, couples, family, and group psychotherapy techniques using both lectures and role-plays methodologies.

      Advanced Intervention Electives

      All Psy.D. students choose one.

      PSY 801 - Psychoanalytic Approaches II (3 cr.)

      This course is designed to apply evidence-based theories of psychoanalysis, including but not limited to classical Freudian (drives, dreams, defenses, and transference) ego psychology, object relations (British & Middle Schools), self-psychology, relational, intersubjective, affect regulation (Allan Schore and colleagues), and mentalization (Peter Fonagy and colleagues) approaches to clinical practice.

      PSY 802 - Cognitive and Behavioral Therapy Approaches II (3 cr.)

      This is an advanced course that will cover in-depth applications of cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, and third wave therapies including mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT; Zindel Segal, Mark Williams, and John Teasdale), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT; Steven Hays), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Marsha M. Linehan), and cognitive processing therapy (CPT; Patricia Resick).

      PSY 803 - Humanistic and Existentialist Therapy Approaches II (3 cr.)

      This course builds on the knowledge and skills developed in the introductory course in humanistic and existential approaches by developing a more in-depth appreciation of particular theories and perspectives in this area of practice.

      PSY 804 - Couple and Family Therapy Approaches II (3 cr.)

      This is an advanced course that will cover classical family and couples models through postmodern approaches. This course will build on the knowledge and skills acquired in Couples and Family Therapy Approaches I (PSY 723).

      PSY 824 - Advanced Adlerian Interventions and Assessment (3 cr.)

      This class will teach Adlerian theory and interventions within play therapy, group therapy, family therapy, and assessment of lifestyle and social interest.

      Electives (Regular and Advanced)

      Psy.D. students choose five from the courses listed below. Emphasis courses meet this requirement.

      PSY 712 - Bio-Psycho-Social-Spiritual Aspects of Addiction (3 cr.)

      Major theories of etiology, social dynamics, and psychology of alcohol and other drug disorders are presented within the context of human development. Clinical research is reviewed, which enhances a further understanding of the basic physiological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects.

      Psy.D. students in their 2nd year or beyond

      PSY 753 - Child & Adolescent Psychopathology (3 cr.)

      The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the major psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence. The focus is on the interaction of biogenic, familial, environmental, and sociocultural factors.

      Psy.D. students in their 2nd year or beyond

      PSY 756 - Group Psychotherapy (3 cr.)

      The history, theory, methods, and applications of group psychotherapy are examined, discussed, and demonstrated. The development of competency in group methods is enhanced through didactic presentation, role-playing, and participation in an ongoing group.

      Psy.D. students in their 2nd year or beyond

      PSY 763 - LGBTQ Issues Across the Lifespan

      This course focuses on LGBTQ persons across the life span and examines the evolution of the LGBTQ movement from multiple dimensions. This course includes strategies useful in working with LGBTQ individuals of different ages and ethnicities.

      Psy.D. students in their 2nd year or beyond

      PSY 783 - Advanced Child and Adolescent Assessment (3 cr.)

      This course presents a structured approach to the psychological assessment of children and adolescents, including advanced issues in interviewing children and adolescents; conducting mental status examinations with young clients; and evaluating cognitive, social, and emotional functioning in children and adolescents.

      Psy.D. students in their 2nd year or beyond

      PSY 784 - Introduction to Military Psychology (3 cr.)

      This course introduces the student to military culture, structures, and systems. The course also introduces the student to the specialty of military psychology, which aims to improve the lives of service personnel and is applicable to a wide range of areas within the military community.

      Psy.D. students in their 2nd year or beyond

      PSY 785 - Psychology of Combat & Conflict (3 cr.)

      Examination of the psychological impact of direct or secondary experiencing of conflict, including the physical and psychological sequelae of combat and the impact of combat-related manifestations on family members and others.

      Psy.D. students in their 2nd year or beyond

      PSY 870 - International and Cross-Cultural Studies (3 cr.)

      This course will provide doctoral students with a cultural-immersion experience outside of the United States. Students will be engaged in a nonclinical service-learning program for a limited period of time.

      Psy.D. students in their 2nd year or beyond

      PSY 706 - Trauma Focused Approaches to Interventions (3 cr.)

      This course covers the history, etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of trauma-related dysfunction, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), acute stress disorder (ASD), and common comorbidities.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 713 - Advanced Treatment of Addictive Disorders (3 cr.)

      This course will focus on the examination and evaluation of evidence-based treatment practices for addictive disorders, including process addictions.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 717 - Primary Care Psychology (2 cr.)

      This class covers the special and unique role of psychologists as part of an integrated healthcare team in a primary care medical setting. Students will learn about interprofessional collaboration with physicians, nurses, social workers, and other providers.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 718 - Medical Terminology and Conditions for Primary Care Psychologists (1 cr.)

      This course covers medical conditions with which psychologists usually intervene, including diseases of the endocrine system, nervous system, cardiovascular system, pulmonary system, and musculoskeletal system.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 719 - Mindfulness Meditation (3 cr.)

      This integrated experiential and scientific course will teach students to manage their own stress and to teach mindfulness-based meditation to others to help them to manage their stress.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 733 - Theories and Techniques of Clinical Hypnosis

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 735 - Assessment & Intervention in Behavioral Medicine I (3 cr.)

      The focus of the course is management of mild to moderate disease, disease prevention, and positive health behaviors. Illustrative interventions that integrate wellness will involve disorders such as hypertension, diabetes, and somatoform disorders.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 736 - Assessment & Intervention in Behavioral Medicine I (3 cr.)

      This course focuses on coping with acute and chronic disease states in which disease/disability, rather than lifestyle/prevention, dominates. The disease or disability is sufficiently severe to require major behavioral changes, and, often, changes in personal identity.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 754 - Special Topics in the Treatment of Children, Adolescents, Young Adults, and/or Families (3 cr.)

      This course will provide students an opportunity to study topics pertinent to the diagnosis and treatment of children, adolescents, young adults, and/or their families.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 757 - Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy (3 cr.)

      The purpose of this course is to provide a conceptual framework for interventions with children and adolescents. The course will focus on specific interventions and research on the major psychotherapeutic approaches for children and adolescents, including cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, family systems, Adlerian, person-centered, and parent-infant psychotherapy.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 758 - Biofeedback (3 cr.)

      This class presents the theory and application of applied psychophysiology (biofeedback) as it is practiced today within mind-body medicine. A review of the components of the autonomic and central nervous systems underlying commonly used psychophysiological measures (EEG, EMG, HR, etc.) will be presented.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 764 - Neuropsychological Assessment I (3 cr.)

      This course is the first in a three course sequence designed to familiarize students with the foundations of neuropsychological assessment. This course provides a detailed overview of neuropsychological assessment techniques in common usage.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 765 - Neuropsychological Assessment II (3 cr.)

      This course is a continuation of PSY 764 and is designed to be taken immediately after this prerequisite.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 783 - Advanced Child and Adolescent Assessment (3 cr.)

      This course presents a structured approach to the psychological assessment of children and adolescents, including advanced issues in interviewing children and adolescents; conducting mental status examinations with young clients; and evaluating cognitive, social, and emotional functioning in children and adolescents.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 797 - Testing, Assessment, and Treatment in DOD and VA Healthcare Systems (3 cr.)

      Psychological and neurological assessment of active duty, veteran, and retired military service members and their families is the focus of this course. Assessment methodology includes integrative, objective, and performance-based personality assessments and self-report measures.

      Military Emphasis students only

      PSY 798 - Trauma-Informed Theory, Assessment, and Treatment in Military Clinical Psychology (3 cr.)

      This course is dedicated to the various aspects of the trauma spectrum. Subject areas include psychological trauma due to combat or combat-related exposure, moral injury, military sexual assault, military sexual harassment, traumatization due to minority discrimination and oppression-based race, sexuality, gender, ability, and/or religious affiliation.

      Military Emphasis students only

      PSY 805 - Advanced Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy (3 cr.)

      This course covers advanced intervention strategies and emerging developments in the treatment of children and adolescents.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 806 - Advanced Trauma-Focused Approaches to Intervention (3 cr.)

      This course covers advanced issues concerning the diagnosis and treatment of trauma-related dysfunction, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and common comorbid conditions.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 811 - Advanced Issues in Co-Occurring Disorders (3 cr.)

      This advanced course builds on foundational knowledge from Introduction to Addictive Disorders (PSY 709) and Trauma-Focused Interventions (PSY 706). The course will explore selected theories and methods for engaging and retaining clients in substance abuse and trauma treatment.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 821 - Neo-Adlerian Theory: Integration of Adlerian Theory with Evidence Practice (3 cr.)

      This course will teach how many of the current theories and evidence-based practices complement and support Adlerian theory and practice. Students will learn how master therapists in most approaches focus on the relationship, social connection, schemas, and behaviors just as Adler did.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 822 - Death, Dying, Bereavement, Loss-Focused Approaches to Intervention (3 cr.)

      This course covers the psychological theories, cultural responses, individual and family system reactions, and treatment relevant to individuals facing death, dying, life-threatening illness, bereavement, other losses, and long-term caregiving.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 823 - Adlerian Parent Consultation and Family Therapy (3 cr.)

      This course will teach students child guidance and parenting knowledge and skills based on Adlerian principles to be practiced in parent consultation and family therapy.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 839 - Advanced Statistical Technique (3 cr.)

      This course will focus on analysis of multiple independent/predictor variables using multiple regression and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) approaches.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 864 - Pediatric Neuropsychology (3 cr.)

      This course provides training in the neuropsychological assessment of children, with an emphasis on trauma and developmental disorders. An array of neuropsychological instruments is used. Students develop skills in the administration, scoring, contextual interpretation, and write-up of pediatric neuropsychological assessment methods.

      Clinical Neuropsychology Emphasis students only

      PSY 865 - Advanced Neuropsychological Assessment and Conceptualization (3 cr.)

      This course offers a structured approach to case conceptualization and analysis in preparation for clinical practice and ultimately board certification. It covers advanced topics in neuropsychological assessment through the application of fact-finding exercises and didactic instruction.

      Clinical Neuropsychology Emphasis students only

      PSY 877 - Issues in Religion and Spirituality - Theory and Therapy (3 cr.)

      This course is designed to increase the sensitivity and competence of clinicians to the spiritual concerns of clients. This sensitivity includes familiarity with the research on spirituality and health; basic knowledge of diverse religious/spiritual paths; awareness of the potential benefits, harm, resources, and issues of spirituality for clients as well as an understanding of the clinician’s spiritual perspective.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 884 - Geriatric Neuropsychological Assessment (3 cr.)

      This course focuses on the development of knowledge and skills necessary to perform psychological assessments and neuropsychological screenings, with an emphasis on older adults.

      Clinical Neuropsychology Emphasis students only

      PSY 912 - Psychopharmacology (2 cr.)

      This course is an introduction to the scientific principles and clinical information needed for a basic understanding of the uses and limitations of the major classes of psychopharmacologic agents.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 930 - Trauma, Grief, & Loss with Children, Adolescents, and Families (3 cr.)

      This course emphasizes theories and treatment approaches related to the experiences of trauma, grief, and loss with children, adolescents, and their families.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 931 - Development Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.)

      This course emphasizes assessment and intervention approaches focused on the treatment of children and adolescents diagnosed with autism spectrum and/or other developmental disorders. Research-supported treatments, such as applied behavior analysis (ABA), will be the central focus of this course.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      PSY 932 - Assessment & Intervention Adolescents Young Adults (3 cr.)

      This course emphasizes theories and treatment approaches related to the treatment of older adolescents and young adults. Specifically, the unique developmental task associated with this phase of the life span and associated impact on mental health and well-being will be addressed.

      Psy.D. students in their 3rd year or beyond

      Social Justice Practicum

      200-hour internship to give students real world experience

      A unique and proven program designed to give students real world experience throughout their time at Adler University, the Social Justice Practicum is a required 200-hour internship that spans four courses (or terms for online programs). Every student is given a number of civic-minded categories to choose from. They submit their desired areas of interest. After which, they are assigned a specific and aligned community outreach site where they will work 8 to 10 hours per week.

      Learn about Adler’s Social Justice Practicum

      Faculty Spotlight

      Rabiatu Barrie, Ph.D.
      Assistant Professor, Child and Adolescent Track, Psy.D. Program

      I approach research from a social justice and advocacy framework. My interest is in exploring the intersection of multiple identities such as race, gender, and class from a developmental perspective on both an individual and community level that are conceptualized and interpreted within a systemic context. More specifically, I am interested in how racism, trauma and violence affect the development of Black masculinity.

      Read More on Rabiatu

      Admissions Requirements

      Admissions requirements:

      • A baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited US institution or a comparable degree from an international institution.
      • An academic record that demonstrates ability to fulfill the academic demands of the program. Successful applicants typically have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate or graduate coursework.
      • A GRE general test score is required as part of the application for our Psy.D. program. The GRE must have been taken within 5 years of your intended start term. The GRE is only one component reviewed. Applicants are reviewed holistically, taking many factors into consideration.
      • Practicum or work experience in psychology or a related field is highly desirable and is considered in the evaluation of applicants.
      • The equivalent of 18 semester credit hours in psychology with grades of “C” or better, including the following prerequisite courses: general or introductory psychology, abnormal psychology, and research methods or statistics. Equivalent coursework in other social and natural sciences may also be considered. Students may be admitted prior to completing these prerequisites, but all students must complete these courses by the end of their first semester of enrollment at the Adler University.
      • Approved applicants will be invited to a personal interview as a final step in the application process.

      Applicants are required to submit the following items to be considered for admission:

      • Application and application fee
      • Statement of Intent (2-3 pages, double-spaced) answering the following questions:
        • Why are you interested in your chosen field and program?
        • Why is Adler University’s program a good fit for you?
        • What are your career goals and interests?
      • Resume or Curriculum Vitae
      • Official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate schools attended (U.S and Canada)
        • Please have official transcripts sent directly to the Office of Admissions
        • Unofficial transcripts may be accepted for any schools in which a degree was not
          received
        • International transcripts must be evaluated by a transcript evaluation service
      • Two letters of recommendation
        • These should be from someone who can specifically speak to your academic and professional abilities

      Approved applicants will be invited to complete an interview with faculty.


      Please submit all application materials including official transcripts to the Office of Admissions prior to the application deadline.

      Adler University – Office of Admissions
      17 N. Dearborn Street
      Chicago, IL 60602

      Official electronic transcripts should be sent to [email protected].

      Information for International Applicants

      Tuition & Fees

      Tuition for Adler University’s programs is charged each term according to the number of registered academic credits. The number of credits a student will register for varies by academic program and by term. To estimate the amount of tuition and fees that would be charged in a given term, please use our Tuition Estimator tool below, or read about tuition and fees for all Chicago programs.

      Tuition Estimator

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      Adler University Releases 2020 Annual Report: Break Through

      As a global pandemic threatened lives and livelihoods, 2020 brought to light obstacles to social justice. Adler University was motivated by the breakthroughs and challenges of 2020 to deliver on our mission: educating our students to create a more just world.

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      IPSSJ Assesses Impact of Restorative Justice Practices in Juvenile Detention Centers

      In the fall of 2015, the Institute on Public Safety and Social Justice (IPSSJ) at Adler University was asked to assess the impact of restorative justice practice trainings held by the Illinois Balanced and Restorative Justice project (IBARJ) in four Juvenile Detention Centers (JDCs) in Urbana-Champaign, Vernon Hills, Rockford, and Peoria.

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